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  • Neuroscientific studies suggest life-long hetero***ual monogamy is most likely to provide satisfaction Neuroscientific studies suggest that "life-long hetero***ual monogamy" is most likely to provide both ***ual satisfaction and excitement, a Melbourne conference heard at the weekend. — “Neuroscientific studies suggest life-long hetero***ual”,
  • However, it is currently an interdisciplinary science that collaborates with other fields such as psychology, mathematics, Neuroscientific research on free will is also in the early stages of. — “Neuroscience - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Affective Computing and Interaction: Psychological, Cognitive and Neuroscientific Perspectives Affective Computing and Interaction: Psychological, Cognitive and Neuroscientific Perspectives examines the current state and the future prospects of affect in computing within the context of interactions. — “IGI Global - Affective Computing and Interaction”, igi-
  • Alibris has Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and Practical Applications and other books by Stephen M Stahl, Nancy Munter (Illustrator), including new & used copies, rare, out-of-print signed editions, and more. — “Essential Psychopharmacology: Neuroscientific Basis and”,
  • However, he knew that he lacked the neuroscientific tools to understand its neurobiological substrate. Today, after an explosion of neuroscientific investigation over the past few decades, those tools now exist. — “ARNMD”,
  • World's largest neuromarketing research firm, leveraging breakthrough neuroscience advances for business and market research. — “Neuromarketing | Neuroscientific Consumer Testing | NeuroFocus”,
  • Neuroscientific definition, the field of study encompassing the various scientific disciplines dealing with the structure, development, function, chemistry, pharmacolog See more. — “Neuroscientific | Define Neuroscientific at ”,
  • Definition of neuroscientific in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of neuroscientific. Pronunciation of neuroscientific. Translations of neuroscientific. neuroscientific synonyms, neuroscientific antonyms. Information about neuroscientific in the. — “neuroscientific - definition of neuroscientific by the Free”,
  • Q: What does the term 'neuroscientific net' mean? A: In the given context, the term refers to: The network of ideas, persons and institutions that pertain to the multifaceted discipline of neuroscience; their relations and mutual influences inside and outside the discipline. — “: ”,
  • Christof Koch makes a compelling argument: My empirical studies into the neurobiology of consciousness have convinced me that many species share the sights and sounds of life with us humans. Why? First, except for size, there are no large-scale,. — “The Neuroscientific Case for Vegetarianism : The Frontal Cortex”,
  • A neuroscientific defense of pop music. Posted by Michael Nestor on Apr 27, 2010. I am going to take a little break from the serious stuff to present something that I really enjoy thinking about in my free time-how the brain processes music. — “A neuroscientific defense of pop music - Michael Nestor's”,
  • On November 13, the Center for Neurotechnology Studies at the Potomac Institute for Policy Studies will present the lecture "From a Neuroscience of Pain to a Neuroethics of Care" by Prof. James Giordano, internationally known for his work on the. — “Program to address neuroscientific progress in pain management”, news-
  • Neuroscientific Skullduggery Confirmed, Sceptics Are Not Surprised who will be the first to apologise to Mr. Houben, and what article Laureys will publish in respected neuroscientific journals. — “Neuroscientific Skullduggery Confirmed, Sceptics Are Not”,
  • The Neuroscientific Corporation had the right names associated with it to be a hot new stock issue. By selling shares to the public, the tiny manufacturer of medical equipment hoped to transfer a. — “New Yorkers & Co.; A Potentially Hot New Issue Is Put on Ice”,
  • From date: 12/21/1969To date: 12/21/1969Law professor Michael Saks participated in a panel discussion on neuroscientific evidence at a symposium held on Feb. 27, at Stanford Law School.Alternate Text: man's portraitIs. — “Saks speaks at Stanford Law conference | ASU News”, asunews.asu.edu
  • Textbook - Rent Buy Sell Nine***th-Century Origins of Neuroscientific Concepts by Clarke, Edwin - 9780520078796, Price $44.90. Textbooks - Easy. Fast. Cheap!. — “Nine***th-Century Origins of Neuroscientific Concepts”,
  • NeuroScientific Insights, Psychiatry Practice, Clinical Research We provide medication management and psychotherapy for the full spectrum of mental health issues as Major depression, Bipolar disorder, anxiety and panic disorders, eating disorders, sleep disorders, women's health care including. — “NSI - Home”,
  • Contrary to some opinion, actual neuroscientific discoveries have exerted little influence on the details of materialist philosophies of mind. Current neuroscientific understanding of the mechanisms and coding strategies implemented by sensory. — “The Philosophy of Neuroscience (Stanford Encyclopedia of”, plato.stanford.edu
  • neuroscience n. Any of the sciences, such as neuroanatomy and neurobiology, that deal with the nervous system Neuroscientific research on free will is also in the early stages of understanding.[14] Thus, neuroscientists are continuously. — “neuroscience: Definition from ”,
  • What have neuroscientific techniques contributed to the development of Multi-store models of STM and LTM rest upon neuroscientific data suggesting. — “Neuroscientific Evidence on the Distinction between Short”, www-personal.umich.edu
  • The Consciousness Project at the Centre for Neuroscientific Studies is presently conducting pioneering neuroscientific research work within the science and religion domain in India. — “Home Page of the Centre for Neuroscientific Studies”, cns.res.in
  • Your satisfaction is our goal and our guarantee. If you are not satisfied with our services call us and we will make it right. Fully and thoroughly updated with the many neuroscientific developments that have happened in the eight years. — “The Neuroscience of Psychotherapy: Healing The Social Brain”,
  • Definition of neuroscientific in the Medical Dictionary. neuroscientific explanation. Information about neuroscientific in Free online English dictionary. What is neuroscientific? Meaning of neuroscientific medical term. What does neuroscientific. — “neuroscientific - definition of neuroscientific in the”, medical-

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  • Leading Minds: Maximising Profit through Social Intelligence - What Neuroscience Tells Us Neuroscientific perspectives on leadership, social intelligence and sales. Summary of the event "Maximising Profit through Social Intelligence" with Mike Pagan (UK), Andy Habermacher (UK/CH) and Srini Pillay (SA/USA). Focusing on neuroscience and practical applications in business using neuroscience and social intelligence to make more money.
  • Distracted: The Erosion of Attention and the Coming Dark Age Today's technological inventions offer rapid-fire virtual relations and instant access to reams of data. But the costs of such advances are mounting. In Distracted, Maggie Jackson examines the rise of an attention-deficient modern culture, marked by split-focus, social diffusion, frenetic movement and superficial thinking. Among other subjects, she explores the cultural history, anatomy, psychology, and plasticity of attention, and relates the remarkable new neuroscientific discoveries related to this crucial human faculty.
  • Meta-Magick - Magick and NLP - Up/Down Thinking In this clip from a live seminar, Philip H. Farber demonstrates a basic principle of Meta-Magick, that where and how you place your attention can influence your reality. In this exercise, Phil places his attention up and is easy to lift, then places his attention down and is difficult to lift. This exercise and Exercise 1 are borrowed from martial arts to make a magical point - and this demonstration becomes very useful when taken with other Meta-Magick techniques. Meta-Magick draws on diverse roots, including Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP), martial arts, memetics, applied kinesiology, hypnosis, yoga, Taoism, neuro-scientific discoveries, and much more, in addition to Western esoteric traditions. Meta-Magick offers tools and systems to uncover, observe and replicate phenomena in ways that can be calibrated and tested. "Meta" means "above" or "beyond," and "Meta-Magick" signifies magick that enables us to think about magick and produce magick. It is magick about magick. For more info: www.meta-
  • Neurotransmitters Two animated characters discuss neuroscientific matters (neurotransmitters GABA or gamma-aminobutyric acid, , norepinephrine or epinephrine and noradrenaline or adrenaline).
  • Speaking of Science Series - Emery Brown: Anesthesia-A Neuroscience Phenomenon How the brain reacts to anesthesia is a neuroscientific phenomenon that includes a dash of mystery. But the study of anesthesia could lead to treatment of sleep issues frequently associated with many mental disorders.
  • Dr Merzenich at the Move into Life Workshop July 2009 Dr Merzenich elaborates on Anat's ideas from a neuroscientific perspective during the recent Move into Life workshop in San Rafael, Ca.
  • Patricia Churchland on Neuroethics Patricia Churchland is a Canadian-American philosopher working at the University of California, San Diego. In this video, she introduces her work and discusses her current projects which explore the potential impact of neuroscientific research on our understanding of human nature and morality. Her recent research has focused on the neurotransmitter oxytocin, and its relationship to social recognition, pair bonding, anxiety, trust, love, and maternal behavior. Patricia Churchland's complete "Exchanges at the Frontier" radio broadcast with philosopher AC Grayling can be found here:
  • How does the brain generate consciousness? Baroness Susan Greenfield: ANU Baroness Susan Greenfield CBE Hon FRCP, Member, House of Lords, United Kingdom, Professor of Synaptic Pharmacology, Lincoln College, Oxford University presents this lecture: How does the brain generate consciousness? This video was recorded at The Australian National University on 30 August 2010, and was the keynote speech at a John Curtin School of Medical Research symposium: New Perspectives in Clinical Neuroscience and Mental Health. Susan Greenfield was both an undergraduate and graduate at Oxford, but has subsequently spent time in postdoctoral research at the College de France, Paris, with Professor J Glowinski and at the New York University Medical Centre, New York, with Professor R Llinas. As a consequence of working in both biochemical and electrophysiological environments she has developed a multidisciplinary approach to exploring novel neuronal mechanisms in the brain that are common to regions affected in both Alzheimer's and Parkinson's disease. The basic theme of her research is to develop strategies to arrest neuronal death in these disorders. She is also co-founder of a university spin-out company specialising in novel approaches to neurodegeneration, - Synaptica Ltd In addition, Professor Greenfield has a supplementary interest in the neuroscientific basis of consciousness, and accordingly has written 'Journey to the Centres of the Mind Toward a Science of Consciousness' (1995) WH Freeman Co, and 'Private Life of the Brain' (2000) Penguin. Her latest book ...
  • KDS - Ian Jukes, Understanding the Digital Generation - New course featuring Ian Jukes - Because of digital bombardment and the emergence of the new digital landscape, "digital natives" process information, interact, and communicate in fundamentally different ways than any previous generations. In this course, Ian Jukes introduces neuroscientific and psychological research that explains how the use of technology, including frequent interruptions and shifts in attention, impacts the functions of the brain.
  • Designed to Hesitate: Consciousness as Paying Attention CED 50th Anniversary - Visualizing the Future of Environmental Design: Designed to Hesitate: Consciousness as Paying Attention Barbara Maria Stafford, Department of Art William B. Ogden Distinguished Service Professor, Emerita, University of Chicago If we look at how human beings behave when they involve themselves in more complex activities (thinking, communicating, investigating, observing) we observe that they slow down, even hesitate. This talk seeks to open the door onto a dialogue between the mind-science of the humanities and the brain-science of neurobiology, through the development of a typology of looking based on neurological research and different art formats. Barbara Maria Stafford is at the forefront of a growing movement that calls for the humanities to confront the brain's material realities. In Echo Objects: The Cognitive Work of Images (University of Chicago Press, 2007), she argues that humanists should seize upon the exciting neuroscientific discoveries that are illuminating the underpinnings of cultural objects. In turn, she contends, brain scientists could enrich their investigations of mental activity by incorporating phenomenological considerations — particularly the intricate ways that images focus intentional behavior and allow us to feel thought. www.ced.berkeley.edu
  • Software of the Mind - Aphasia, Phantom Limb, Neuroscience (2) Some philosophical and neuroscientific ramblings and musings on topics such as: Aphasia - Speech and Language Disorders of the Mind. Neuroscience -- some mappings of the brain. How the Brain is NOT a computer; it's more like a weather system and is unique in its adaptive qualities Phantom Limbs -- How people can actually feel limbs that do not exist! Pain -- Pain (as well as other sensory input) is a construct of the mind because people with no legs, actually feel pain "in their foot"! Fascinating! Learn more about this mental software, NLP, neuroscience, and sensory input @ 20110305_johntkucz_triunebrain.m4v Recorded in Michigan.
  • Richard Restak - Neuroscience and Advertising Complete program at: fora.tv Acclaimed neurologist Richard Restak discusses ways in which advertisers may potentially use neuroscientific research to sell products. ----- Richard Restak on "The *** Brain." Each time neuropsychiatrist Restak visits with a new book, we learn more about the exciting findings being made in neurology. In his new book, Restak writes about "social neuroscience," the interaction between our brains' hard wiring and our social relationships. - Politics and Prose Dr. Richard Restak is a practicing neurologist and neuropsychiatrist and the author of dozens of articles and more than 15 books on the brain, including "The Brain," "Mysteries of the Mind," and "The Longevity Strategy." "The Brain," also a companion book to a PBS series, was a national bestseller. Restak has appeared on National Public Radio's Morning Edition and All Things Considered, PBS's McNeil-Lehrer Report, NBC's Today Show, ABC's Good Morning America, and the Discovery Channel. Restak has served on various national advisory councils for brain research and has been a consultant to PBS and to NBC's Today Show. Dr. Restak is a graduate of Georgetown University School of Medicine.
  • Sunil Aggarwal, PhD, Explains the Medical Geography of Marijuana [HD] Transcription to follow: My name is Sunil Aggarwal. I am a trainee in the medical scientist program at the University of Washington, 4th year medical student, I hold a PhD in medical geography. Recently I was a medical student delegate to the American Medical Association. Cannabis is a botanical medicine that has an established track record of safety, non-toxicity, for 3 millennia of documented history. And effectiveness that' been shown in numerous highly randomized control trials, all the way to case reports from numerous cultures around the world. Plus the psychologically activating properties of cannabis, which I thought, were important for stress reduction and quality of life. Plus it's discovery, it helped caused us to discover a signaling system, in humans and throughout most living organisms, called the cannabinoid signaling system which was fascinating from a neuro-scientific standpoint for me.
  • Understanding the Digital Generation by Ian Jukes - Because of digital bombardment and the emergence of the new digital landscape, "digital natives" process information, interact, and communicate in fundamentally different ways than any previous generations. In this course, Ian Jukes introduces neuroscientific and psychological research that explains how the use of technology, including frequent interruptions and shifts in attention, impacts the functions of the brain.
  • Jung and Loss of soul -1. Atheism & Theism How resistant we are to the suggestion that our greatest attribute, rational thinking is not a default setting for humans but our cognitive processes are largely unconscious, and we have to work vigilantly to establish & maintain logical thought. When people like Jung first suggested it based on his research it was not an easy sell, but Now we have a growing flood of neuro-scientific data which suggests that a lot of cognitive processing goes on beneath the level of our awareness which shows just how complex our thinking is influenced by not only rational logical decisions but unconscious instinct and archetype. In this video I want to explain in more detail Jung's contribution to this understanding of the psyche which is increasingly being verified. Video: "Ata Whenua" - Murihiku films Recommended reading: "Living Myth" D Stephenson Bond
  • Neuroscientific studies with 3D-Game Characters Within the ELEKTRA-Project there are two neuroscientific studies that ***yse the effect of computer animated learning games
  • Software of the Mind - Aphasia, Phantom Limb, Neuroscience (1) Some philosophical and neuroscientific ramblings and musings on topics such as: Aphasia - Speech and Language Disorders of the Mind. Neuroscience -- some mappings of the brain. How the Brain is NOT a computer; it's more like a weather system and is unique in its adaptive qualities Phantom Limbs -- How people can actually feel limbs that do not exist! Pain -- Pain (as well as other sensory input) is a construct of the mind because people with no legs, actually feel pain "in their foot"! Fascinating! Learn more about this mental software, NLP, neuroscience, and sensory input @ 20110305_johntkucz_triunebrain.m4v Recorded in Michigan.
  • Waza Introduction Video Created using our Natural Learning Approach™—combining Tribal Pedagogy and the latest principles of neuroscientific research—Waza™ (Zulu for think) ignites an early passion for math in an engaging interactive program, immersing kids in a vibrant and intuitive play experience with fun challenges, not typical "math problems."
  • Meta-Magick - Magick and NLP - Attention Influences Reality In this clip from a live seminar, Philip H. Farber demonstrates a basic principle of Meta-Magick, that where and how you place your attention can influence your reality. In this exercise, a subject places his attention behind him and has difficulty pushing past Phil's arm - however, when he places his attention ahead of him, he pushes past very easily. Meta-Magick draws on diverse roots, including Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP), martial arts, memetics, applied kinesiology, hypnosis, yoga, Taoism, neuro-scientific discoveries, and much more, in addition to Western esoteric traditions. Meta-Magick offers tools and systems to uncover, observe and replicate phenomena in ways that can be calibrated and tested. "Meta" means "above" or "beyond," and "Meta-Magick" signifies magick that enables us to think about magick and produce magick. It is magick about magick. For more info: www.meta-
  • The Poetics of Cognitive Operation In a number of these videos I have been referring to 'poetics' of various sorts, particularly to a poetics of knowledge or of science, and I'm still trying to sort out what I really mean by this term. Partly I am influenced here by the writing of Gaston Bachelard, whose 'Poetics of Space' and 'Poetics of Reverie' are enormous influences. Also, Raymond Gibbs use of the term in 'The Poetics of Mind' in which he identifies certain cognitive operations which allow us to make sense of the world and refers to this sense making as ultimately poetic. Also, Jacques Ranciere's 'poetics of knowledge' in which he suggests that the discourse of empirical science has its own poetic tropes and figurations, a particular poetic genre which seems to disguise itself through an appeal to metaphors of lucidity, solidity, and transparence. For me these various poetics are phenomenological or psycho***ytic descriptions which could potentially touch down on a neuroscientific account of brain functioning and on the cognitive operations by which the relatively raw data of the senses (real and virtual) becomes lived experience.
  • Meta-Magick - Magick and NLP - The Origins of Meta-Magick Take a trip into your own mind to discover your innate magical abilities! Meta-Magick is an emerging system of practice designed to ... all » increase learning, intuition and communication abilities and accelerate the growth of new neural pathways in the brain. Powerful, effective and fun exercises are easy to follow and learn - as you are gently guided into surprisingly transformative experiences. Meta-Magick draws on diverse roots, including Neuro-linguistic Programming (NLP), martial arts, memetics, applied kinesiology, hypnosis, yoga, Taoism, neuro-scientific discoveries, and much more, in addition to Western esoteric traditions. Meta-Magick offers tools and systems to uncover, observe and replicate phenomena in ways that can be calibrated and tested. "Meta" means "above" or "beyond," and "Meta-Magick" signifies magick that enables us to think about magick and produce magick. It is magick about magick. In this short clip, Philip H. Farber explains just a bit about the origins of Meta-Magick... Watch for upcoming clips with exercises that you can practice... and to learn more about Meta-Magick, visit: www.meta-
  • The Mystery of Consciousness This educational documentary film that we have been working on for almost three years is about consciousness largely with a philosophical and neuroscientific bents. The goal of this film is to explore Francis Crick's framework for consciousness, which is the neural correlate(s) of consciousness. We believe that the question of consciousness is an empirical one and has to be unraveled objectively, but we are wondering whether neuroscientific frameworks and discoveries can give us (a) clue(s) about the subjective aspects of consciousness. Many are leery of believing that neuroscience can solve this mystery, saying the problem of consciousness "lies outside our cognitive capacities." Although, a philosophical definition of consciousness is broader than a clinical one, it is very useful to know what happens in the brain when we feel the redness of red, the painfulness of pain, the funniness of a funny joke, and so on. No one has produced any plausible theory or explanation about how subjective experiences arise from over a trillion neurons.
  • The Neuroscientific Challenge to Criminal Responsibility STEPHEN J. MORSE Ferdinand Wakeman Hubbell Professor of Law Professor of Psychology and Law in Psychiatry University of Pennsylvania Law School The Neuroscientific Challenge to Criminal Responsibility MONDAY, MARCH 2 4:30 PM o 3 ROCKEFELLER HALL The William H. Timbers '37 Lecture Co-sponsored with the Dartmouth Legal Studies Faculty and the Dartmouth Lawyers Association
  • UVU: Cultivating the Creative Mind Immordino-Yang is an assistant professor of education at the Rossier School of Education and an Assistant Professor of Psychology for the Brain and Creativity Institute at the University of Southern California. She studies the bases of the brains emotions, social interaction, culture and its implications for development and learning and is also the inaugural recipient for the Award of Transforming Education through Neuroscience. The award is co-sponsored by the International Mind, Brain and Education Society (IMBES) and the Learning and the Brain conference. Immordino-Yang lectures nationally about how the arts foster creativity and the latest in neuroscientific and developmental evidence of what creativity is and how it is grounded in emotional and cognitive processing. Keynote address: Our bodies, our minds, our "selves": Neurobiological perspectives on creativity Recent advances in neuroscience are highlighting connections between socio-emotional feelings and learning that have the potential to revolutionize our understanding of the role of affect in creativity. In this talk I will discuss our new work on the neurobiology and psychology of admiration and compassion, demonstrating how these emotions can be inspirational, how they appear to influence biological and sociocultural development, how they may differ across cultures, and how they may promote social, intellectual, and artistic creativity. We will also discuss how these emotions reveal connections between the ...
  • Neuroscience - Paul Jennings Professor Paul Jennings, WMG, presents on the neuroscientific research his Experiential Engineering team undertake to ***yse the end users experience of products within key public sectors, including the motor industry and healthcare.
  • James Booker - So Swell When You're Well.mp4 From "The Lost Paramount Tapes." In addition to fascinating speculations and conjectures about the possible nature of mental illness, drug addiction, and/or other hardships of James Booker's life, his musical abilities on the piano raise cognitive neuroscientific questions about just what it takes to play as if you have three hands and hemispheres of cortex. Listen carefully to some of his music and you will become convinced that either a second musician is playing, two riffs have been dubbed, or even both. But, this is one man playing a backup beat (or two) and one or two separate harmonies by himself all at once.
  • Cortical Near Death Experience More info: - Interview with Eben Alexander, III, MD, FACS by Amy Hardie - more info about Amy here: regarding neuroscientific perspective of memory; tapping back into mystery at the Gateway Voyage program - more info about the Gateway Voyage here: A coma experience rewired my brain and the Gateway Voyage was valuable in allowing me to re-enter that realm. Memory formation is greatly affected by going deep into consciousness, including journeys at The Monroe Institute.
  • Drug Rehab Center | Holistic Healing | Moonview Sanctuary is a non-residential treatment and optimal performance center for individuals who are challenged by emotional, physical, social or spiritual upheavals. MoonView specializes in combining Eastern and Western approaches practiced by more than 70 experts in their fields. Our individualized programs blend holistic, spiritual, and scientific treatments that are unlike any traditional program. The treatment focuses on addressing the uniqueness of each individual by incorporating advanced neuroscientific technology with ancient wisdom to produce a customized mode of psychological, physical and spiritual healing. For more information, please visit
  • [2] Brain Story: In the Heat of the Moment - Part. 5 Episode 2 - Part 5 "This is probably one of the best TV series on psychology and neuroscience ever produced, the BBC's Brain Story. It is a six part series covering virtually every area of contemporary neuropsychology, including the major researchers, discoveries, techniques and even many of the patients who have been the subjects of classic case studies that have helped us understand the curious effects of brain injury. It is presented by neuroscientist Prof Susan Greenfield."
  • The Philosophical Baby: Alison Gopnik For most of us, having a baby is the most profound, intense, and fascinating experience of our lives. Now scientists and philosophers are starting to appreciate babies, too. The last decade has witnessed a revolution in our understanding of infants and young children. Scientists used to believe that babies were irrational, and that their thinking and experience were limited. Recently, they have discovered that babies learn more, create more, care more, and experience more than we could ever have imagined. And there is good reason to believe that babies are actually smarter, more thoughtful, and even more conscious than adults. This new science holds answers to some of the deepest and oldest questions about what it means to be human. A new baby’s captivated gaze at her mother’s face lays the foundations for love and morality. A toddler’s unstoppable explorations of his playpen hold the key to scientific discovery. A three-year-old’s wild make-believe explains how we can imagine the future, write novels, and invent new technologies. Alison Gopnik—a leading psychologist and philosopher, as well as a mother—explains the groundbreaking new psychological, neuroscientific, and philosophical developments in our understanding of very young children, transforming our understanding of how babies see the world, and in turn promoting a deeper appreciation for the role of parents.
  • What is Involved in Applying to a Law School? Senior Law School Consultant, Derek Meeker, discusses the many steps involved in the Law School Admissions Process. Derek has nine years of admissions committee experience and is the former dean of admissions at the University of Pennsylvania Law School. He currently assists students with the law school application process as a consultant with AdmissionsConsultants, Inc.
  • EyeQuant: Neuroscientific Website Optimization EyeQuant is a neurotechnology that helps companies dramatically improve user attention on their websites and display ads. It predicts within seconds where users will look and what users will see, enabling rapid and cost-efficient marketing and conversion optimization.
  • Cognitive Neuroscience of Mindfulness Meditation Google Tech Talks February, 28 2008 ABSTRACT Mindfulness meditation, one type of meditation technique, has been shown to enhance emotional awareness and psychological flexibility as well as induce well-being and emotional balance. Scientists have also begun to examine how meditation may influence brain functions. This talk will examine the effect of mindfulness meditation practice on the brain systems in which psychological functions such as attention, emotional reactivity, emotion regulation, and self-view are instantiated. We will also discuss how different forms of meditation practices are being studied using neuroscientific technologies and are being integrated into clinical practice to address symptoms of anxiety, depression, and stress. Speaker: Philippe Goldin Philippe is a research scientist and heads the Clinically Applied Affective Neuroscience group in the Department of Psychology at Stanford University. He spent 6 years in India and Nepal studying various languages, Buddhist philosophy and debate at Namgyal Monastery and the Dialectic Monastic Institute, and serving as an interpreter for various Tibetan Buddhist lamas. He then returned to the US to complete a Ph.D. in Clinical Psychology at Rutgers University. His NIH-funded clinical research focuses on (a) functional neuroimaging investigations of cognitive-affective mechanisms in adults with anxiety disorders, (b) comparing the effects of mindfulness meditation and cognitive-behavioral therapy on brain ...
  • My Brain Made Me Do It Battle of Ideas 2007, Royal College of Art, London Speakers: Pierre Magistretti, David Perks, Jeffrey Rosen, Raymond Tallis, Steve Yearley Blurb: With the politics of behaviour in the ascendancy, there is increasing interest in what science can tell us about why people behave the way they do. The British government is funding the creation of the National Academy for Parenting Practitioners, with the express aim of training a 'parenting workforce' to provide science-based child-rearing advice to parents. In the USA, the MRI scanner and the neuroscientific community are entering the court room to give evidence about whether defendants can be regarded as being responsible for their alleged crimes. UK policymakers cite scientific 'evidence' to explain new interventions on everything from early years' education to the alleged impact of school dinners on academic performance. The science of nutrition now informs earnest discussions about how children's diets improve their classroom behaviour, in order to justify policing lunchboxes and putting school meals at the top of the political agenda. Studies of ***age brain development now regularly inform social debates about the impact of new technologies on young people. But how much can science tell us about behaviour? Do scientific findings justify the government's many interventions into the early years of children's lives? Should neuroscience enjoy an exalted place in the courtroom? Are policies being developed because of ...
  • Michael Gazzaniga - The Interpreter The third in a series of Gifford Lectures by Professor Michael Gazzaniga. Recorded 15 October, 2009 at the Playfair Library Hall, the University of Edinburgh. The interpreter is the device we humans enjoy that provides us with the capacity to see the meanings behind patterns of our emotions, behavior and thoughts. This concept is central to understanding the relationship between our brain and our strong sense of self. In a way, it is the device that liberates us from our automatic ways spelled out in Lecture 1 and 2. The interpreter constructs the sense that there is a me arising out of the ongoing neuronal chatter in the brain and making all of lifes moment-to-moment decisions. Our compelling sense of being a unified self armed with volition, deployable attention and self-control is the handiwork of the interpreter, for it brings coherence to a brain that is actually a vastly parallel and distributed system. This view stands in contrast to much neuroscientific theorizing or existential musing about our unified, coherent nature. In most models of brain and cognitive mechanism, one can identify, as Marvin Minsky once said, the box that makes all the decisions.
  • neuGRID, A Grid Brained Infrastructure to Understand and Defeat Neurodegenerative Diseases Project Presentation and Video Demonstration Launched early 2008 by the EC Research Infrastructure Unit, the neuGRID project aims to establish a distributed e-Infrastructure interconnecting major clinical research centres in Europe, ultimately supplying neuroscientists with the most advanced ICT to defeat Alzheimer's disease and neurodegenerative pathologies in general. Based on EGEE gLite, neuGRID is pioneering a harmonized and powerful environment to develop and assess new disease markers. The recently deployed infrastructure already offers a promising algorithm pipeline, ie the ***ysis of cortical thickness from 3D magnetic resonance brain images, as a demonstrator of its underlying computing engine capacity. The proposed demonstration will show the results of neuGRID's current ***ysis challenge which consists in using the grid to execute the former pipeline on the large US-ADNI dataset to assess this imaging disease marker. This will be the 1st time such a challenge is undergone in the neuroscientific community.
  • The reason for Unseenstring's Channel This introductory segment for Unseenstring's Channel came from a lecture titled, What do neuroscientific discoveries imply for free will and responsibility? (14:05--15:25/1:52:51) Presented January 12, 2007, by Instructor and Neuro-philosopher Patricia Churchland. The course was titled, NEURO ENIGMAS II: Large-Scale Problems in Neuroscience. UC San Diego, Cognitive Science 200, Winter 2007 The video is available at TSN (TheScienceNetwork Org). One of the problems I see involved in neuroscience is that they look upon behavior from the neurological-chemical level. They can tell us why particular behavior happen from that perspective. But only an interdisciplinary approach involving all of the behavioral sciences (anthropology, psychology, cognitive science, organization theory, psychobiology, and social neuroscience) is going to give us a glimpse of the big picture. In other words, neuroscience cannot tell us in detail all the environmental circumstances that result in a person's brain developing a particular neuroanatomical structure and chemophysiological state, which utimately determine the functions of the brain and thus behavior of the individual. The brain is a very complex physical system and should be investigated using the scientific method, as is normally done with other physical systems, instead of "introspected" using constantly disputed arguments of philosophers and folk psychology. Also, some academia (and politicians) feel the free will illusion is necessary ...
  • Raymond Tallis - Free Will and the Brain Complete video at: fora.tv British gerontologist, author and cultural critic Raymond Tallis addresses questions regarding free will and the brain. ----- "Battle of Ideas: My Brain Made Me Do It" at the 2007 Battle of Ideas conference hosted by the Institute of Ideas. With the politics of behaviour in the ascendancy, there is increasing interest in what science can tell us about why people behave the way they do. The British government is funding the creation of the National Academy for Parenting Practitioners, with the express aim of training a 'parenting workforce' to provide science-based child-rearing advice to parents. In the USA, the MRI scanner and the neuroscientific community are entering the court room to give evidence about whether defendants can be regarded as being responsible for their alleged crimes. UK policymakers cite scientific 'evidence' to explain new interventions on everything from early years' education to the alleged impact of school dinners on academic performance. The science of nutrition now informs earnest discussions about how children's diets improve their classroom behaviour, in order to justify policing lunchboxes and putting school meals at the top of the political agenda. Studies of ***age brain development now regularly inform social debates about the impact of new technologies on young people. But how much can science tell us about behaviour? Do scientific findings justify the government's many interventions into the early years of ...
  • José Manuel Giménez-Amaya: "Understanding free will: a philosophical and neuroscientific approach" Professor José Manuel Giménez-Amaya (Universidad Autónoma de Madrid and CRYF) gave a lecture at the Workshop in memory of Professor Mariano Artigas, organized by the Thomas More Institute and the Research Group on Science, Reason and Faith (CRYF) of the University of Navarra. www.unav.es
  • HH Dalai Lama on Secular Ethics and Contemplative Education This is a short except from a private Mind and Life Meeting in Dharamsala India in April 2009 Entitled: Attention, Memory and the Phenomenological Study of the Mind: A Synergy of Psychological, Neuroscientific, and Contemplative Perspectives. In this excerpt, HH Dalai Lama discusses the need for a secular ethics and the related cultivation of certain universal ethical qualities like compassion and forgiveness through contemplative practice. The notion of introducing such practice earlier in development through education is also discussed.
  • Chicago's Best Idea's: "What the Law Should (and Should Not) Learn From Child Development Research" Presented by Emily Buss The law has always treated children differently, and these differences in treatment are largely attributed to differences in capacity. Children lack the decision making ability and the self-control of adults, the cases and commentary explains, and therefore should be given less control over their own lives, and blamed less severely for their offenses. For much of the 20th century, these developmental arguments were grounded in life experience and conventional wisdom. More recently, however, developmental psychologists and legal scholars have joined forces to argue for legal rights and responsibilities that more accurately and consistently reflect psychological (and, most recently, neuroscientific) research about how children change as they grow up. This heavy reliance on developmental science was embraced by the Supreme Court in Roper v. Simmons, the 2005 case ruling that the Constitution prohibited the imposition of the death penalty for offenses committed by juveniles. While the Roper ***ysis can be applauded for its careful attention to social scientists' increasingly sophisticated understanding of children's capacities, it also demonstrates certain risks that come with this inter-disciplinary approach. In her talk, Buss will consider these risks, and suggest an approach to the formulation of children's rights that rests less on our current understanding of children's capacities and more on the role we want the law to play in shaping how ...
  • Greater Baltimore Neurosurgical Associates Greater Baltimore Neurosurgical Associates provides the broad spectrum of care for people with brain and spine disorders, diseases, injuries and back and neck pain. Under the leadership of Dr. Reginald Davis, Greater Baltimore Neurosurgical Associates incorporates a broad spectrum of non-surgical and surgical treatments and services. The mission of Greater Baltimore Neurosurgical Associates is to relieve the pain and anxiety we know our patients feel and return them to the life they want to live. We accomplish that by using the most advanced surgical technologies and treating our patients and their family members with exceptional personal care. We also accomplish our mission by reaching out to the medical community in sharing neuro-scientific knowledge and techniques. Contact Us Physicians Pavilion North Suite 600 6535 N. Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland 21204 Phone: (443) 849-4270 Fax: (443) 849-4280

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about neuroscientific

  • “Discovering Waldorf – Waldorf from a Neuroscientific Perspective' Why Waldorf works has the last 20 years of neuroscientific inquiry supports Steiner's theories, including some”
    — Water's Edge Waldorf School,

  • “Chandler on Neuroscientific Evidence for Lie Detection. Jennifer A. technology of detecting deception using neuroscientific methods such as neuro-imaging?”
    — CrimProf Blog: Chandler on Neuroscientific Evidence for Lie,

  • “Your Guide To A Better *** Life! BigThink magazine interviewed pioneers of neuroscientific *** studies into the female orgasm in their article "Braingasm: *** and Your Synapses": /ideas/24021”
    — David Shade's Masterful Lover Blog, masterful-

  • “Neuroscientific findings & links to "crazier" phenomenon In a forum recently there was a discussion recently about psi-phenomena, some really strong arguments that it doesnt exist. No matter what one said eg 'you can only say that you havent witnessed a white elephant not that they dont exist', 'hey”
    Neuroscientific findings & links to "crazier" phenomenon,

  • “Is neuroscientific evidence now relevant to assessments of criminal responsibility? by the substantial amount of neuroscientific evidence that was presented there; rather,”
    — 3TU.Centre for Ethics and Technology,

  • “Recently published in Neuroethics: Not so Fast. On Some Bold Neuroscientific Claims Concerning Human Agency Andrea Lavazza1 and Mario De Caro2 (1) Viale A. Doria, 17, Milano, 20124, Italy (2) Dipartimento di Filosofia, Università Roma Tre, Via”
    — "Not so Fast. On Some Bold Neuroscientific Claims Concerning,

  • “Why Waldorf works has more to do with how the brain develops and functions optimally than Rudolf Steiner ever could have known. Sure the educator and founder of Waldorf Education theorized convincingly about how children learn best, but until”
    — Why Waldorf Works | Our Kids Blog,

  • “Information on search engine marketing, Internet marketing, website promotion, Internet advertising, email marketing, email advertising, web linking and more! Learn how Internet marketing services and Internet advertising can grow your online”
    Neuroscientific Article Marketing Tips! | Internet Marketing,

  • “This will search the titles of the threads in the Chemistry forum Personalize your forum posts with your photo and hometown. Apply to become an editor of”
    — Study Finds Neuroscientific Basis for Love - Topix,

  • “Neuroscientific Study on Speaking in Tongues. The N.Y. Times recently published a However, one of the contributors also served as a research subject:”
    — Alex Chediak Blog: Neuroscientific Study on Speaking in Tongues,

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