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  • When an investigator wants to replace one allele with an engineered construct but not affect any other locus in the genome, then the method of choice is homologous recombination. To perform homolgous recombination, you must know the DNA sequence of the gene you want to replace (figure 1). — “Homolgous Recombination & Knockout Mouse”, bio.davidson.edu
  • The bones of the human wrist (the carpals), palm (the metacarpals), and fingers and thumb (the digits) bear a strong similarity to the greatly varied homologous structures in the forelimbs and "hands" of mammals. so on) would be termed homologous if their common ancestor also. — “Homology (biology) - New World Encyclopedia”,
  • Definition of homologous from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of homologous. Pronunciation of homologous. Definition of the word homologous. Origin of the word homologous. — “homologous - Definition of homologous at ”,
  • Definition and other additional information on Homologous from Biology- dictionary. — “Homologous - definition from Biology-”, biology-
  • For use of the term 'homologous' in reference to chromosomes, see Homologous chromosomes. However, they are not homologous as wings, because the organ served as a forearm (not a wing) in the last common ancestor of. — “Homology (biology) - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Definition of homologous in the Legal Dictionary - by Free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. What is homologous? Meaning of homologous as a legal term. What does homologous mean in law?. — “homologous legal definition of homologous. homologous”, legal-
  • It is also hard to make sense of the fact that homologous structures can be inefficient or even useless. That is, even when two species function in completely different ways, they often use homologous structures to carry out those functions. — “Evolutionary Genetics”, zoology.ubc.ca
  • Homologous competitive binding curves. Introducing homologous competition. The most common way to determine receptor number and affinity is to perform a saturation binding experiment where you vary the concentration of radioligand. An alternative. — “Homologous competitive binding curves”,
  • Definition of homologous in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of homologous. Pronunciation of homologous. Translations of homologous. homologous synonyms, homologous antonyms. Information about homologous in the free online English dictionary and. — “homologous - definition of homologous by the Free Online”,
  • Definition of word from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games. Definition of HOMOLOGOUS. 1. a : having the same relative position, value, or structure: as (1) : exhibiting biological homology (2) : having the same or allelic genes. — “Homologous - Definition and More from the Free Merriam”, merriam-
  • In biology, two or more structures are said to be homologous if they are alike because of shared ancestry. This could be evolutionary ancestry, meaning that the structures evolved from some structure in a common ancestor (the wings of bats and. — “Homologous - Psychology Wiki”,
  • Homologous definition, having the same or a similar relation; corresponding, as in relative position or structure. See more. — “Homologous | Define Homologous at ”,
  • We found 44 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word homologous: homologous: American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language [home, info] homologous: Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary, 11th Edition [home,. — “Definitions of homologous - OneLook Dictionary Search”,
  • Homologous recombination is a natural safety mechanism that conserves DNA integrity and protects chromosomes from DNA damage such as DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) induced by UV damage, chemical agents, etc. This recombination mechanism is well. — “Homologous Recombination | Cellectis bioresearch”, cellectis-
  • Antibiotic resistance meiosis bivalents Homologous sister chromatids agh nodullmoment: John Legend is Homologous. JulesPereira: of the Skene's gland found in the Gspot area along the walls of the urethra The male prostate is biologically Homologous to the female Gspot. — “Homologous - Define Homologous at WordIQ Online Dictionary”,
  • Homologous chromosomes are non-identical chromosomes that can pair (synapse) during meiosis, and are believed to share common ancestry. The forelimbs of mammals provide a good example for homologous structures. The word homologous derives from the ancient Greek ομολογειν, 'to agree'. Contents. — “Homology - ”,
  • Definition of homologous from The American Heritage Science Dictionary. — “homologous - Science Definition”,
  • homologous (comparative more homologous, superlative most homologous) Lobules, homologous in structure, recur again only in the Gondw***andic families Lepidolaenaceae and Jubulopsidaceae thus in the. — “homologous - Wiktionary”,
  • homologous adj. Corresponding or similar in position, value, structure, or function. Biology . Similar in structure and evolutionary origin, though. — “homologous: Definition from ”,
  • Top questions and answers about Homologous. Find 160 questions and answers about Homologous at Read more. — “Homologous - ”,
  • The word homologous derives from the ancient Greek ομολογειν, 'to agree' Homology is important in reproduction because pairs of homologous chromosomes line up together during meiosis. — “Homology - Susan's Place Transgender Wiki”,
  • Are you looking for information on homologous chromosomes? This article will explain related definitions, give you a brief idea of chromosomal functions and an overview of their importance in genetics Homologous Chromosomes. — “Homologous Chromosomes”,

Videos
related videos for homologous

  • Pastornate discusses homologous structure! pt. 2 Pastornate points out the scientific facts about homologous structure and entropy
  • Donexodus2 on Haekel Donexodus2 falsely claims Haekel's drawings were ridiculed because they were exaggerated, and that Haekel belived similar structures in the embryos of humans and other creatures were evidence of phyogenic ancestry because DNA could not change. This is not unlike to the false beliefs evolutionists preach regarding ednogenous retroviruses, germ layers, and homologous structures and phylogeny. Donexodus2 and other evolutionists have never let go of Haekel's falsified idea regarding similar structures and still preach it today - 140 yrs after it was discredited. Evolutionism is not science. It's assumptions, presumptions, speculations, and dosp[roven claims packaged and repackared to promote the secular humanist religion of materialism.
  • Part 1 of 3 - Introduction to Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology To register for future webinars, visit bit.ly For more information on CompZr Zinc Finger Nucleases visit bit.ly It's a revolution in genomic science. A technique capable of altering the face of basic research and drug discovery. And it's here, ready to help you unlock the darkest mysteries of the scientific universe. CompoZr® ZFN technology is a breakthrough that enables simple and efficient genomic editing exclusively from Sigma Life Science. Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) technology, allows easy creation of novel cell lines and model organisms with precise and heritable gene additions, deletions or modifications. CompoZr ZFN technology gives you the power to add, delete or swap your gene of interest. Now it's all possible. The details: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a class of engineered DNA-binding proteins that enable manipulation of the genome with unprecedented ease and precision. ZFNs create targeted double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genome at user-specified locations. These DSBs are repaired through the cell's natural DNA-repair processes, namely homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. These DSB-caused endogenous processes are harnessed to generate precisely targeted genomic edits resulting in both cell lines and organisms with targeted gene deletions integrations, or modifications. In this webinar, we will discuss the design, mechanism of action, and various applications of ZFN technology.
  • Genome Tour - Y Chromosome (part 2) Today we will be taking another look at the Y chromosome but from another perspective, from Chimp to Human. In the last video we compared Human to Chimp as we navigated homology and drew synteny lines from the genes on the Human Y chromosome to the homologous genes on the Chimpanzee Y chromosome and we found 14 human genes with no homologs in Chimp, several human genes with homologs on chromosomes other than the Chimpanzee Y chromosome and a substantial rearrangement of gene order between the two. In today's look we will be navigating from Chimp to Human in order to see what we missed last time; namely, genes that are on the CHIMP Y chrom which have no homologs on the Human Y chrom or elsewhere in the human genome. So, we are just turning it around to get the other half of the story.
  • My Penis is my ***oris(?) This clip discusses the female G-spot and the similarities between male and female *** organs. --- [Note: the passage below is from the Wikipedia entry on the ***oris, but not the G-spot in which the video clip goes into more detail about] The ***oris is a ***ual organ that is present only in female mammals. In humans, the visible button-like portion is located near the anterior junction of the labia minora, above the opening of the urethra and vagina. Unlike the penis, which is homologous to the ***oris, the ***oris does not contain the distal portion of the urethra. The only known exception to this is in the Spotted Hyena. In this species, the urogenital system is unique in that the female urinates, mates and gives birth via an enlarged, erectile ***oris, known as a pseudo-penis.[1] In humans, the ***oris is the most sensitive erogenous zone of a woman, the stimulation of which may produce ***ual excitement and ***oral erection; its continuing stimulation may produce ***ual pleasure in the woman and orgasm. During the development of an embryo, at the time of development of the urinary and reproductive organs, the previously undifferentiated genital tubercle develops into either a ***oris or penis, along with all other major organ systems, making them homologous.[4] The ***oris is formed from the same tissues that would have become the glans and upper shaft of a penis if the embryo had been exposed to male hormones. Changes in appearance of male and female ...
  • 25. Homologous monalities Dont Prove Common Ancestor(DVD 4, 1hr08:44-1hr10:31) 25. Homologous Structures . Commonalities Dont Prove Common Ancestor . They Might Prove Common Designer . (DVD 4, 1hr08:44-1hr10:31)FYI. I do not allow comments on these videos. If you notice, these video clips are taken from the seminar videos. If you want to leave a comment, you are welcome to go to the seminar video on my channel and leave your comment on that video where these clips are taken from. For organizational reasons I am not taking comments here. If you have already tried to leave a comment on this video, my apologies, you are welcome to repost on the real video featuring this clip by going to my channel page and looking for this DVD under the "playlist" for this Seminar. FYI. I do not allow comments on these videos. If you notice, these video clips are taken from the seminar videos. If you want to leave a comment, you are welcome to go to the seminar video on my channel and leave your comment on that video where these clips are taken from. For organizational reasons I am not taking comments here. If you have already tried to leave a comment on this video, my apologies, you are welcome to repost on the real video featuring this clip by going to my channel page and looking for this DVD under the "playlist" for this Seminar.
  • DNA repair - homologous recombination dsbs signalling updated v 3.0- Full HD The DNA damage response (DDR) of the cell includes: (i) sensing, (ii) signalling and (iii) repair of DNA damage. Double strand breaks (DSBs) are the most toxical DNA damage. They can be produced by ionizing radiation, laser beam, chemical-clastogenic compounds such as bleomycin, Topoisomerase II enzyme, endonucleases or also can be generated from single stranded break (SSB) DNA. Around nine DSB per cell and day are produced in physiological conditions1. The Homologus Recombination (HR) pathway is in charge of DSBs repair, in a error-free fashion, during S or G2 phases of the cell cycle, using sister chromatid as template3 . The sensing and signalling of DSBs are very important for the maintenance of the genome and chromosomal stability. Recent research works, stressed out the key role of post-traslational modification of DDR proteins such as: phosphorilation, acetylation, methylation, ubiquitination and sumoylation in the DNA damage signalling. The HR DDR signalling is believed to act in the following order: the DSB lesion is recognized by MRN complex (MRE11 /RAD50/NBS1), that recruits the ATM (mutated in Ataxia Telangiectasia) kinase. ATM phosphorilates the serine 139 of the γH2AX at the damage site and also in large number of nucleosomes around the DSB and also phosphorilates MDC1 (mediator of DNA damage checkpoint protein 1). At this point the γH2AX-ATM-MDC1 connection generates a possitive feedback loop, that amplifies the DSB signalling. Then, RNF8 (an E3 ubiquitin ...
  • Targeted Gene Integration Part 2 of 3 Third chapter of our ZFN webinar series: Targeted Gene Integration To see our other webinars, visit bit.ly For more information on CompoZr® Zinc Finger Nucleases visit bit.ly It's a revolution in genomic science. A technique capable of altering the face of basic research and drug discovery. And it's here, ready to help you unlock the darkest mysteries of the scientific universe. CompoZr® ZFN technology is a breakthrough that enables simple and efficient genomic editing exclusively from Sigma Life Science. Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) technology, allows easy creation of novel cell lines and model organisms with precise and heritable gene additions, deletions or modifications. CompoZr ZFN technology gives you the power to add, delete or swap your gene of interest. Now it's all possible. The details: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a class of engineered DNA binding proteins that facilitate efficient targeted editing of the genome by creating double-strand breaks (DSBs) at user-specified locations. The cell then employs the natural DNA repair processes of either homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining to heal the targeted break. HDR enables insertion of a transgene or other defined alterations into the targeted region. By this approach, a donor template is used that contains the transgene flanked by sequences that are homologous to the regions either side of the cleavage site. This donor is co-delivered into the cell along with the ZFNs. Target integration ...
  • Biology: Phases of Meiosis In this lesson, Professor Wolfe starts out with an overview of Meiosis and then discusses and explains the processes of both Meiosis I and Meiosis II. During the stages of meiosis I, homologous chromosomes pair and are segregated into separate cells. These stages include prophase I, metaphase I, anaphase I and telophase I. Professor Wolfe will explain what happens durring each of these different phases. He will focus specifically on what is happening with the cell's chromosomes during these phases. In prophase I, homologous chromosomes synapse and form tetrads. In metaphase I, homologous chromosomes organize and line up. In anaphase I, homologous chromosome pairs separate, and in telophase I, a cleavage furrow forms, creating two cells. Each created cell has one chromosome from each homologous pair. During the stages of meiosis II, the doubled chromosomes are divided and move into separate cells as in mitosis. Meiosis II is also made up of stages (prophase II, metaphase II, anaphase II and telophase II), and you will also learn what happens in each of these phases, again with a focus on what is going on with the chromosomes. In prophase II, the nuclear envelope breaks down and spindle fibers form. In metaphase II, chromosomes line up on the metaphase plate. In anaphase II, chromatids separate, and in telophase II, haploid cells are eventually created. After meiosis II there are four cells, each containing the haploid genetic complement. This is the ...
  • multiple sequence alignment using pairwise comparisons (sequence annealing) FSA is a probabilistic multiple sequence alignment algorithm which uses a "distance-based" approach to aligning homologous protein, RNA or DNA sequences. Much as distance-based phylogenetic reconstruction methods like Neighbor-Joining build a phylogeny using only pairwise divergence estimates, FSA builds a multiple alignment using only pairwise estimations of homology. This is made possible by the sequence annealing technique for constructing a multiple alignment from pairwise comparisons, developed by Ariel Schwartz in "Posterior Decoding Methods for Optimization and Control of Multiple Alignments." www.eecs.berkeley.edu
  • The Earthquake- EMS and Non-Homologous End Joining Story of how EMS and Non-Homologous End Joining work!
  • Dr J - Lies In Your Biology Textbook Part 1/9 Dr G Charles Jackson of Points of Origins Ministries ( ) examines some of the evolutionary lies in today's biology textbooks. Part 1 of 9 -- Introduction and Homologous Structures
  • Genetic Variability by Design New alleles are accumulating rapidly in living populations and cellular mechanisms have not been adequately sought to explain the intentional production of these changes. Homologous DNA recombination occurs in all organisms and is at the heart of genetics. Since its discovery during meiosis, these reactions were assumed to occur randomly along the length of chromosomes, and only involved with gene crossovers. It is now well known that meiotic recombination is not the random process it was originally assumed to be, and controlled by highly organized regulatory systems. In addition, a form of homologous recombination has been discovered which is responsible for creating diversity in variable genes, and was recently linked to single base-pair substitutions in immunoglobulins. New allele formation may indeed be the key to explaining the rapid production of distinct breeds, but their presence in the genome has been assumed the result of random mutations. Therefore, the ability of the cell to purposefully edit genes requires evaluation. EVOLUTION COULD NOT DO THIS The US military wishes it had a cheaper stealth bomber (presently the most expensive plane in the world). But the tiger moth has a radar jamming device which switches on as soon as a bat heads toward his way—keeping the bat from locating him! The Department of Defense needs to ask the little fellow how he does it. The tiger moth never paid a dollar for his equipment. It was given to him. The ichneumon wasp (Thalessa ...
  • Part 3 of 3- Introduction to Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology To register for future webinars, visit bit.ly For more information on CompZr Zinc Finger Nucleases visit bit.ly It's a revolution in genomic science. A technique capable of altering the face of basic research and drug discovery. And it's here, ready to help you unlock the darkest mysteries of the scientific universe. CompoZr® ZFN technology is a breakthrough that enables simple and efficient genomic editing exclusively from Sigma Life Science. Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) technology, allows easy creation of novel cell lines and model organisms with precise and heritable gene additions, deletions or modifications. CompoZr ZFN technology gives you the power to add, delete or swap your gene of interest. Now it's all possible. The details: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a class of engineered DNA-binding proteins that enable manipulation of the genome with unprecedented ease and precision. ZFNs create targeted double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genome at user-specified locations. These DSBs are repaired through the cell's natural DNA-repair processes, namely homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. These DSB-caused endogenous processes are harnessed to generate precisely targeted genomic edits resulting in both cell lines and organisms with targeted gene deletions integrations, or modifications. In this webinar, we will discuss the design, mechanism of action, and various applications of ZFN technology.
  • Prophase | Genetics | Biology To purchase this program please visit Segment from the program Meiosis, ***ual Reproduction and ***ual Variability. DVD Description Our Meiosis DVD begins by comparing a***ual and ***ual reproduction and describing chromsomes and homologous pairs. The difference between haploid and diploid cells and the three major eukaryotic life cycles are then described. The program goes on to a detailed description of all the stages of Meiosis I and II including prophase I and II, metaphase I and II, anaphase I and II, and telophase I and II. In the process students are introduced to phenomena such as crossing over and provided an explanation of how meiosis creates genetic variability in a species.
  • Targeted Gene Integration Part 1 of 3 Third chapter of our ZFN webinar series: Targeted Gene Integration To see our other webinars, visit bit.ly For more information on CompZr® Zinc Finger Nucleases visit bit.ly It's a revolution in genomic science. A technique capable of altering the face of basic research and drug discovery. And it's here, ready to help you unlock the darkest mysteries of the scientific universe. CompoZr® ZFN technology is a breakthrough that enables simple and efficient genomic editing exclusively from Sigma Life Science. Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) technology, allows easy creation of novel cell lines and model organisms with precise and heritable gene additions, deletions or modifications. CompoZr ZFN technology gives you the power to add, delete or swap your gene of interest. Now it's all possible. The details: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a class of engineered DNA binding proteins that facilitate efficient targeted editing of the genome by creating double-strand breaks (DSBs) at user-specified locations. The cell then employs the natural DNA repair processes of either homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining to heal the targeted break. HDR enables insertion of a transgene or other defined alterations into the targeted region. By this approach, a donor template is used that contains the transgene flanked by sequences that are homologous to the regions either side of the cleavage site. This donor is co-delivered into the cell along with the ZFNs. Target integration ...
  • Party in the Punnett Square (Party in the USA by Miley Cyrus Parody) Story about Mendel, his name is Greg All day he grew peas Until he noticed a pattern In the pods and leaves. Inheritance, described by Segregation, One allele during gamete production Per sperm or egg Described by Greg Gotta describe homologous chromosomes DNA describes genotype, But the outside shows my phenotype If my fingers touch one on one If I can roll my tongue Left thumb over my right one So I got a Big B With a little b, Too many heterozygotes Dominant on the top line Recessive on the side line So I got a BB With two little p's Genetic traits we're gonna share Yeah, it's a party in the Punnett Square Yeah, it's a party in the Punnett Square 9 3 3 1 with two traits 16 squares dihybrid cross Black or Brown, green or yellow Gotta do a test cross Law of independent assortment Mendel's hypothesis supported Try it with pennies Same law of Probability Gotta describe homologous chromosomes DNA describes genotype, But the outside shows my phenotype Red hair and freckles Free or attached earlobe Do I have dimples? So I got a Big B With a little b, Too many heterozygotes Dominant on the top line Recessive on the side line So I got a BB With two little p's Genetic traits we're gonna share Yeah, it's a party in the Punnett Square Yeah, it's a party in the Punnett Square Feel like making a pedigree See the traits in my family Check out all the disorders We look fine but we might be carriers So I got a Big B With a little b, Too many heterozygotes Dominant on the top line ...
  • Biology A: Unit 5 Quiz Preparation This quick review of the content you will need to know for the unit five quiz will cover: Chromosomes, homologous chromosomes, human cells = 46 chromosomes, Anaphase, Interphase, Mitosis, ***ual reproduction, daughter cells, gametes, cetromere, and DNA. Our guest host for this video is NUA's own Biology student, Crystian Gonzalez.
  • Biology: Homologous Structures for full video
  • Biology: Homologous Chromosomes Professor Wolfe proposes two problems that have to be overcome during meiosis. One problem is that offspring have to have the same number of chromosomes as the parents, which means that the cells used in ***ual reproduction need to have half the number of chromosomes as normal somatic cells. This means that meiotic division has to produce haploid cells. The second problem is the sorting of chromosomes. Each offspring will have to have not just the correct number of chromosomes, but also all the correct types of chromosomes. These two problems can be overcome by understanding that humans don't just have 46 chromosomes, but 23 pairs of chromosomes. A diploid cell is a cell with two copies of each chromosome. ***ual reproduction uses homologous chromosomes, which are chromosome pairs that have the same genetic composition but are derived from different parents. Taught by Professor George Wolfe, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive course, Biology. This course and others are available from Thinkwell, Inc. The full course can be found at The full course covers evolution, ecology, inorganic and organic chemistry, cell biology, respiration, molecular genetics, photosynthesis, biotechnology, cell reproduction, Mendelian genetics and mutation, population genetics and mutation, animal systems and homeostasis, evolution of life on earth, and plant systems and homeostasis.
  • Pastornate discusses homologous structure! pt.1 A reply to cdk007 and his claim that homologous structures prove evolution.
  • Gene Homology ( ) - HomoloGene database identifies homologs among the annotated genes of more than a dozen completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes using an automated procedure. It can find gene homologs (paralogs, orthologs, homologs) based on protein sequence similarity and access pre-computed multiple alignments of homologous proteins. More videos at Abnova ( http ) .
  • Greedy Computation of a Homotopy Basis for a Genus 2 Surface Several tools from topology are useful for mesh processing and computer graphics. These tools often operate on the 1-skeleton of a surface, ie, the graph of edges embedded in the surface. A common task is to find a collection of edges called a cut graph - cutting along these paths turns the surface into a shape which can be flattened into the plane. This kind of flattening is necessary for texture mapping, remeshing, etc. One way to find a cut graph is to find a set of loops, no two of which are homologous, which cut the surface into a disk when removed. Intuitively, two loops on a surface are homologous if one can be deformed into the other while always keeping it entirely on the surface. For a closed orientable surface with genus g (ie, a torus with g handles), there are 2g classes of homologically independent loops. A homology basis consists of one loop from each class. Not every homology basis is a cut graph: some homology bases either disconnect the surface or cut it into a punctured sphere. However, a homotopy basis will cut the surface into a disk. This video shows the greedy homotopy basis for each vertex of the mesh (the magenta square is the current basepoint). The end of the video illustrates the total length of the homotopy basis at each point: the brightness of a vertex corresponds to the total length of the corresponding basis. For more information see www.cs.caltech.edu
  • Part 2 of 3- Introduction to Zinc Finger Nuclease Technology To register for future webinars, visit bit.ly For more information on CompZr Zinc Finger Nucleases visit bit.ly It's a revolution in genomic science. A technique capable of altering the face of basic research and drug discovery. And it's here, ready to help you unlock the darkest mysteries of the scientific universe. CompoZr® ZFN technology is a breakthrough that enables simple and efficient genomic editing exclusively from Sigma Life Science. Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) technology, allows easy creation of novel cell lines and model organisms with precise and heritable gene additions, deletions or modifications. CompoZr ZFN technology gives you the power to add, delete or swap your gene of interest. Now it's all possible. The details: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a class of engineered DNA-binding proteins that enable manipulation of the genome with unprecedented ease and precision. ZFNs create targeted double-strand breaks (DSBs) in the genome at user-specified locations. These DSBs are repaired through the cell's natural DNA-repair processes, namely homologous recombination and non-homologous end joining. These DSB-caused endogenous processes are harnessed to generate precisely targeted genomic edits resulting in both cell lines and organisms with targeted gene deletions integrations, or modifications. In this webinar, we will discuss the design, mechanism of action, and various applications of ZFN technology.
  • Biology: Independent Assortment - homologous chromosomes This lesson covers the concept of independent assortment. This is a critical idea for the tracking of genes and heredity with the help of the idea of meiosis. Tracking genes on chromosomes through meiosis can tell us something about genetics. Homologous chromosomes are chromosome pairs that contain genes that control the same traits. Homologous chromosomes can assort independently of other pairs of homologous chromosomes. This concept is called 'independent assortment' and it leads to many possible combinations of chromosomes in gametes and offspring. The lesson will also explain how disjunction (the separation of homologous chromosomes) further contributes to the number of different chromosomal combinations or outcome possibilities. The combination of synapsis and disjunction occur and create independent assortment, which allows for drastically different trait combinations. The more pairs of chromosomes an animal has, the more possibilities there are for possible combinations of traits and chromosomes in offspring. Taught by Professor George Wolfe, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive course, Biology. This course and others are available from Thinkwell, Inc. The full course can be found at The full course covers evolution, ecology, inorganic and organic chemistry, cell biology, respiration, molecular genetics, photosynthesis, biotechnology, cell reproduction, Mendelian genetics and mutation, population genetics and ...
  • Breakthrough in medicine. Homologous Blood made from Auto-skin Graft. Sent from mobile device.
  • Targeted Gene Integration Part 3 of 3 Third chapter of our ZFN webinar series: Targeted Gene Integration To see our other webinars, visit bit.ly For more information on CompZr® Zinc Finger Nucleases visit bit.ly It's a revolution in genomic science. A technique capable of altering the face of basic research and drug discovery. And it's here, ready to help you unlock the darkest mysteries of the scientific universe. CompoZr® ZFN technology is a breakthrough that enables simple and efficient genomic editing exclusively from Sigma Life Science. Zinc Finger Nuclease (ZFN) technology, allows easy creation of novel cell lines and model organisms with precise and heritable gene additions, deletions or modifications. CompoZr ZFN technology gives you the power to add, delete or swap your gene of interest. Now it's all possible. The details: Zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs) are a class of engineered DNA binding proteins that facilitate efficient targeted editing of the genome by creating double-strand breaks (DSBs) at user-specified locations. The cell then employs the natural DNA repair processes of either homology-directed repair (HDR) or non-homologous end joining to heal the targeted break. HDR enables insertion of a transgene or other defined alterations into the targeted region. By this approach, a donor template is used that contains the transgene flanked by sequences that are homologous to the regions either side of the cleavage site. This donor is co-delivered into the cell along with the ZFNs. Target integration ...
  • Theory of Evolution-Circus LJHS AP BIO extra credit Theres only two theories of life in this world The one by Darwin and the one by Larmarck Well Darwins evolution is the right idea Lamarcks acquired characteristics has to be wrong Theory of evolution by natural selection Survival of the fittest they reproduce Genes will stay in the pool CHORUS Our similarities result from homology Homologous structures came from our ancestry Bottleneck and founder effect in genetic drift Better be ready they will make us speciate Habitual temporal behavioral mechanical gametal isolation Part of reproductive barriers they all keep us from mating Theres nothing stopping us, lets evolve, over generations Everybody lets go separate speciate just like in nature There are only two types of speciation One with geographic separation and one without So allopatric they separate physically In sympatric well stay here Theory of evolution by natural selection Survival of the fittest they reproduce Genes will stay in the pool CHORUS Our similarities result from homology Homologous structures came from our ancestry Bottleneck and founder effect from genetic drift Better be ready they will make us speciate Habitual temporal behavioral mechanical gametal isolation Part of reproductive barriers they all keep us from mating Theres nothing stopping us, lets evolve, over generations Everybody lets go separate speciate just like in nature Lets go Let me see how youre different Our variations keep keep keep us alive Recessive alleles ...
  • Evolution Part 6: Homologous Structures, "Vestigial" Organs Soviet-style brainwashing techniques have been used in the government schools for over 30 years. Students are not taught to think for themselves, or to think logically and critically. This clip further explores false teachings in the field of biology. See also: Read article on the demise of "Mitochondrial Eve" here:
  • DNA Repair, Damage, Genes, Genetics
  • Biology: Meiosis: Prophase I In this lesson, Professor Wolfe starts to discuss the individual phases of meiosis, which are very similar to the phases of mitosis. Meiosis, however, requires two cell divisions because of the creation of haploid cells from the sister chromatids. Ninety percent of meiosis occurs in the first phase, known as Prophase I. In this phase, two very important events occur. The first is the formation of a tetrad through the process of synapsis. Synapsis is the pairing of homologous chromosomes, which form the tetrad structure. These tetrads create areas called chiasmata (chiasma, if singular), where homologous genetic material "crosses over," or is exchanged. This exchange of homologous genetic information will be very important in further study of meiosis.Taught by Professor George Wolfe, this lesson was selected from a broader, comprehensive course, Biology. This course and others are available from Thinkwell, Inc. The full course can be found at The full course covers evolution, ecology, inorganic and organic chemistry, cell biology, respiration, molecular genetics, photosynthesis, biotechnology, cell reproduction, Mendelian genetics and mutation, population genetics and mutation, animal systems and homeostasis, evolution of life on earth, and plant systems and homeostasis. Founded in 1997, Thinkwell has succeeded in creating "next-generation" textbooks that help students learn and teachers teach. Capitalizing on the power of new technology ...
  • MEIOSISHIGHQUAL.mov Introduction: Different types of cells have different methods of reproduction. In a***ual reproduction, cells go through a process called mitosis. In this process, the replicated cells are genetically identical to parent cells, having the same DNA and number of chromosomes. Meiosis is a two-stage form of cell division which promotes genetic variation. In meiosis, daughter cells have half the number of chromosomes. These haploid cells, created by a mother and a father, combine in ***ual reproduction to form a diploid organism that can, in turn grow and reproduce. __ The process in which the cell divides in as follows: Interphase: Chromosomes replicate in the nucleus, but remained uncondensed. Each replicated chromosomes consists of two identical sister chromatids. The centrosome replicates, forming two centrosomes. Prophase I: -Chromosomes condense and appear -Homologous chromosomes (those with similar size, shape, and genetic information) loosely pair up. -A homologous pair could consist of, for example, a chromosome from the father and from the mother. -Two homologous pairs bound together and consisting of four sister chromatids are called tetrads. -In synapsis, a protein structure forms between the homologues, holding them tightly together. Often times, this causes a small breakage of the chromosomes. When the cell puts it back together parts of DNA from one chromosome are transferred to the other. This is called crossing over. -Chiasmata are the criss-crossed regions ...
  • Facts of Evolution - Chapter 2 Chapter 2: Fossil Progression; Vestigial Structures; Distribution; Homologous Structures; Bad Design If you want to know what the scientists know about evolution, then here it is. An enormous breadth of information -- assimilated, compressed, and congealed into an easily understood, visually irresistible presentation. "Facts of Evolution" has layer upon layer upon layer of evidence that makes common decent and macro-evolution inescapable, obvious conclusions. Used with Permission for Educational Use from
  • General Biochemistry Review This course is part of a series taught by Kevin Ahern at Oregon State University on General Biochemistry. For more information about online courses go to ecampus.oregonstate.edu 1. Base excision repair can removed damaged based from DNA. It differs from nucleotide excision repair in removing the damaged base first, followed by removal of a segment where the base was. 2. Disruption of error correction systems can have severe consequences. 3. Error-related systems associated with cancer include HNPCC (colon cancer) and BRC-A (not mentioned in class), which is involved in DNA repair. A critical protein for monitoring DNA for damage prior to division is p53. It can stop the cell cycle if it senses damage and initiate repair. If repair is unable to be performed, p53 can induce cellular suicide - apoptosis. 4. An Ames test uses a selectable marker that can give a readily observable phenotype (such as growth on antibiotic) when mutation happens. By comparing the number of cells with the observable phenotype in a the presence of a test compound to the number of cells in another tube lacking that compound, the mutagenicity of a compound can be determined. 5. Recombination of DNA results in mixing and matching of DNA sequences. The process occurs most often between homologous sequences on different chromosomes. The process can be quite active during meiosis. 6. Recombination proceeds through formation of a Holliday junction. Holliday junctions form as a result of alignment of ...
  • Homologous Recombination of Double Strand Breaks.mpg Video for MCB 164 at UC Davis
  • 我愛你by SHE: Genetics, How We Are Genetics: How We Are Written by Joyce Chou Tune from 我愛你By SHE What makes us who we are inside? They're genes that determine How we look, how we are At birth from the start Who discovered all these properties? That is indifferent to us and to him It's Mendel, it's Mendel Starting from all of his peas He saw that all the peas grew from generation to the next And to the next Genotype the genetic makeup Phenotype the appearance Or other characteristic That seems to always appear An example for genotype would be Two A's Two capital A's Phenotype It would be Brown for eyes It's a color Homologous Dominant Or recessive traits there are That has 2 capital or lower case letters Heterozygous It has 1 dominant And one recessive in its genotype Homologous chromosomes Have the same sequence of Genes And structure, structure Chromosomes Genetics ~~~~~~~~~ One gene Can determine A lot of traits At a time There can be more Like a tigers eyes It has maybe more Then there is Diploids It contains 2 haploids Then there is the Haploids It is unpaired Chromosomes Then there is Diploids It contains 2 haploids Then there is the (THIS IS GENETICS) Haploids It is unpaired (GENETICS) Chromosomes (THIS IS GENETICS) This is genetics
  • Diploid Haploid Cells | Genetics | Biology To purchase this program please visit Segment from the program Meiosis, ***ual Reproduction and ***ual Variability. DVD Description Our Meiosis DVD begins by comparing a***ual and ***ual reproduction and describing chromsomes and homologous pairs. The difference between haploid and diploid cells and the three major eukaryotic life cycles are then described. The program goes on to a detailed description of all the stages of Meiosis I and II including prophase I and II, metaphase I and II, anaphase I and II, and telophase I and II. In the process students are introduced to phenomena such as crossing over and provided an explanation of how meiosis creates genetic variability in a species.
  • Is Intelligent Design Science, Stephen C. Meyer? Stephen C. Meyer thinks intelligent design is science, but that doesn't make it so. Why is he wrong, and just how wrong is he? For more skepticism and youth-related things, feel free to check out two of my other websites, (my personal evolution blog) and (the Young Australian Skeptics, home of the Pseudo Scientists podcast, which I am a panel member on).
  • Homologous series Members of homologous series differ from one to another by a specific structure or unit.
  • Meiosis Wrapped Up Words by Arthur W. Siebens, Ph.D., Copyright 1999 Performed by Sean Cunningham Keeping track of genes is one of nature's wonders That's why you've got chromosomes-to avoid major blunders Cell duplication's impressive, it's called mitosis But you ain't seen nothin' 'til you've seen meiosis Remember eggs and sperm are called gametes Want to know how they're made? You're in for a treat! Now meiosis takes eight steps instead of just four 'Cause there's two cell divisions (1) we're about to explore In prophase I a unique event happens Homologous chromosomes join-its called synapsis (2) Yes, when tetrads form, DNA can be swapped So genes from Mom's chromosome are now on Pop's This crossing over increases recombination So there's no one like you in all the United Nations! Chromosomes then line up in metaphase I But what's important in anaphase (I) is what's not undone That's the centromere, which remains unbroken Homologous chromosomes move apart (3)-the products will be 1N (haploid). So the chromosome number's down to 23 'Course that assumes you're a human like me But each chromosome's got two chromatids Which just won't work when making kids So after telophase I and interphase II The cell divides again--similar phase names are used So there's prophase (II) and metaphase (II) and anaphase (II) In anaphase II the centromere finally breaks (4),* So each sperm or egg gets only one copy Of 23 chromosomes (5)-can't afford to be sloppy So after telophase II and cytokinesis Meiosis is ...

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about homologous

  • “Science discussion forum: Protein homologies provide overwhelming evidence for common descent. The presence of homologous proteins across species is considered evidence of common lineage in the scientific literature”
    — Protein homologies provide overwhelming evidence for common,

  • “Posts Tagged homologous serum jaundice' How to Protect your Liver from Infectious Tags: DIET, hepatitis, homologous serum jaundice, jaundice, liver, liver infections,”
    Homologous Serum Jaundice,

  • “August Carnival – At Homologous Legs Blog! August 7, 2008 · Leave a The next Skeptics of Carlos will be hosted at the blog of Homologous Legs!”
    — August Carnival – At Homologous Legs Blog! " Skeptics Of,

  • “2007 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology: transgenic mouse Mario Capecchi and Oliver Smithies both had the vision that homologous recombination could be used to specifically modify genes in mammalian cells and they worked consistently towards this goal”
    — 2007 Nobel Prize in Medicine or Physiology: transgenic mouse,

  • “Homologous Legs is the blog of Naon Tiotami (aka. Jack Scanlan), an Australian © 2010 Homologous Legs - All Rights Reserved. Banner graphics by Faster ***cat Productions”
    — Tabletop Transitional – 8-bit Dr. Horrible's Sing Along Blog,

  • “However, if crossing over occurs(which can be tested, by construction of a linkage map) then it is obvious that they do have homologous regions. However, if crossing over occurs(which can be tested, by construction of a linkage map) then it is obvious that they do have homologous regions”
    homologous *** chromosomes - Biology-Online, biology-

  • “Still, the fact they belonged to the same Infraorder means they would have homologous traits. Frills on two different ceratopsians would be considered homologous because they were derived from the same ancestor, even if they looked”
    — Webosaurs Blog " ***ogous,

  • “Information about Women and men fertility. Prophase Homologous Chromosomes. BProphase Homologous Chromosomes - Learn more about Prophase Homologous Chromosomes. Permalink -- click for full blog post "Prophase Homologous Chromosomes"”
    — Fertility Health Blog, fertility-health-