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Examples
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  • Definition of Homeomorphic in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of Homeomorphic. Pronunciation of Homeomorphic. Translations of Homeomorphic. Homeomorphic synonyms, Homeomorphic antonyms. Information about Homeomorphic in the free online English. — “Homeomorphic - definition of Homeomorphic by the Free Online”,
  • The relation is homeomorphic to' between topological spaces is the most fundamental relation in topology, because two topological spaces that are homeomorphic are indistinguishable from a topological point of view – they are topologically equivalent. — “1 Topological spaces and homeomorphism - Surfaces - OpenLearn”,
  • A continuous deformation between a coffee mug and a doughnut illustrating that they are homeomorphic. Two spaces with a homeomorphism between them are called homeomorphic, and from a topological viewpoint they are the same. — “homeomorphism: Definition from ”,
  • Then $X$ is locally homeomorphic to $Y$ if for every $x\in X$ there is a neighbourhood $U Again, let $X=\{1\}$ be a discrete space with one element, but now let $Y=\{2,3\}$ the space with topology $\{\emptyset,\{2\},Y\}$ Then $X$ is still locally homeomorphic to $Y$ but $Y$ is. — “PlanetMath: locally homeomorphic”,
  • Definition of homeomorphic, possibly with links to more information and implementations. — “homeomorphic”, xw2k.nist.gov
  • Protein families will be clustered into "homeomorphic superfamilies" Thus, it should be valid to construct an evolutionary tree from the members of a homeomorphic superfamily. — “CLASSIFICATION TERMINOLOGY”, pir.georgetown.edu
  • Encyclopedia article about Homeomorphic. Information about Homeomorphic in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. — “Homeomorphic definition of Homeomorphic in the Free Online”, encyclopedia2
  • A continuous deformation between a coffee mug and a doughnut illustrating that they are homeomorphic. Two spaces with a homeomorphism between them are called homeomorphic, and from a topological viewpoint they are the same. — “Homeomorphism - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • is connected, then f is homeomorphic in A. B. 4. Proof of Theorem 1.1. the. property that f does not have a locally homeomorphic extension to. — “Mappings of finite distortion: Removable singularities for”, math.jyu.fi
  • Any infinite-dimensional Fréchet space homeomorphic with its countable product is topologically a Hilbert space. A Vitali set can be homeomorphic to its complement. 2007, Tim D. Austin, Mathematical Proceedings of the Cambridge Philosophical Society, volume 142:. — “homeomorphic - Wiktionary”,
  • Homeomorphism means similarity of shape. In chemistry, crystals of two different compounds are called homeomorphic if their forms are very close to each other. — “What is homeomorphism? - The Times of India”,
  • Topological Preliminaries. Topology is one of (quite a few) mathematical theories that permeate other branches of Mathematics connecting them into one coherent whole There are nonhomeomorphic sets that are continuous 1-1 images of each other. — “Topological Preliminaries”, cut-the-
  • . may be for sale Premium-Domain- Please contact us for more information. Search the Web:. — “”,
  • Theorem 1.1 Let M be a complete Riemannian manifold homeomorphic to the Euclidean Toponogov proves that, if 0 K 1 (not assuming the manifold to be homeomorphic to. — “Pogorelov — Klingenberg theorem for manifolds homeomorphic to R”,
  • Search for " Homeomorphic " in NRICH | PLUS | | Google. Definition (undergraduate level) Two sets are called homeomorphic if there exists a homeomorphism between them, i.e. a continuous map with a continuous inverse. This is most frequently used of two topological spaces. — “Homeomorphic”,
  • For example, there exist wild embeddings of simple arcs into E(3): homeomorphic images of the unit interval such that the complement is not simply Example (Antoine's necklace) A homeomorphic image of the Cantor set (which is compact and totally. — “Algebraic Topology: Knots, Links, Braids”,
  • It is used to prove that the sphere with a pinched point is homeomorphic to the plane. Show that the sphere and the hollow cube are homeomorphic, in any dimension. — “Homeomorphism - Computer Vision Primer”,
  • A continuous deformation between a coffee mug and a donut illustrating that they are homeomorphic. Thus, a square and a circle are homeomorphic to each other, but a sphere and a donut are not. — “Homeomorphism”, schools-
  • homeomorphic to the gait manifold in a kinematic 3D body configuration space. homeomorphic to unit circle, the actual data is used to learn nonlinear warping between. — “Homeomorphic Manifold ***ysis: Learning Decomposable”, tgers.edu
  • Prove that if a and b are real numbers and a. — “homeomorphic in the real numbers? Prove that if a and b are”,

Videos
related videos for homeomorphic

  • Aditya Mittal on Topological Representations of Circle This video shows several different ways of representing a circle and what it is to be homeomorphic to a circle. It tries to help build a very conceptual understanding of the topological concept without all the formalism and equations. I make no claim to having made any of these concepts. I am only reiterating in an easy to understand and concise manner.
  • Homeomorphism, LMMS dubstep Just started using LMMS - some others of mine:
  • AlgTop2c: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle (cont.) This is the third video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry.
  • Explicit construction of block mesh duals by addition of local dual contributions Xevi Roca and Josep Sarrate Laboratori de Càlcul Numèric (LaCàN), Departament de Matemàtica Aplicada III, Universitat Politècnica de Catalunya web: www-lacan.upc.edu Several algorithms have been devised in order to generate hexahedral meshes for any geometry. During last decade alternative methods based on the dual of a hexahedral mesh have been developed [1]. This work is devoted to obtaining a valid topological block decomposition of a given domain without a previous discretization of the boundary [2]. To this end, we propose an approach to directly construct a valid dual of the block mesh. The proposed algorithm is composed by two main steps 1- we create a reference mesh, a tetrahedral mesh, of the domain to decompose into blocks; and 2- we create the dual of the block mesh by using the new concept of local dual contributions. These contributions are planar surfaces inside the tetrahedra of the reference mesh. The union of these contributions define a discretized version of the dual surface arrangement. To test the possibilities of the local dual contributions we propose a new block meshing algorithm based on this concept. The tool automatically adds local dual contributions following a set of hierarchical rules. These rules ensure that the local dual contributions define a valid discretized representation of the dual of the final block mesh. Specifically, adjacent local dual contributions define regions that are locally homeomorphic to: (i) one dual surface (a layer ...
  • AlgTop2a: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle This is the first video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry.
  • AlgTop2e: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle (cont.) This is the fifth video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry.
  • Rational Plane Curves Given a curve C={f=0} of degree d in complex projective 2-space, one may ask, if C admits a parametization, ie if there is a rational map from projective 1-space to C with dense image. C minus the singularities of C is a 1-dimensional complex manifold, ie a real surface. As a topological space it is homeomorphic to a compact oriented surface minus finitely many points. Compact oriented surfaces are topologically classified by their genus g, the number of handles one has to attach to a sphere to obtain the given surface. Necessary and sufficient for a curve to admit a parametrization is the condition g=0. If rp is the multiplicity of C at p and C has rp different tangents at p, then g is (d-1)*(d-2)/2 minus the sum of rp*(rp-1)/2 for all points p of C. If the equation f has rational coefficients, a parametization with rational coefficients can be given, up to a field extension of degree 2, which may be necessary if d is even. In the example shown the curve C (drawn in red) is given by a polynomial of degree 5 and has 3 double points and one triple point, so the formula above reads g = 4*3/2-1-1-1-3 = 0, hence C admits a parametrization. The theorem of Bezout implies, that the curve C of degree 5 intersects a quadric in 5*2 = 10 points, counted with multiplicities. Hence the system of all quadrics (shown in green) through the singular points of C has 5*2-3-2-2-2 = 1 moving point of intersection with C. Elimination gives the coordinates of this point in terms of the ...
  • Good Will Hunting Maths Problem The problem Matt Damon's character solved in 'Good Will Hunting' - Homeomorphically Irreducible Trees of degree ten. The problem sounds complex but is actually very easy.Robin Wilson, Gresham Professor of Geometry, explains the problem and shows the simple solutions. This is the 21st part of 'A Millennium of Mathematical Puzzles'. The full lecture is available (in 24 parts) here on YouTube, or it can be downloaded (like all of our lectures) in its complete form from the Gresham College website, in video, audio or text formats: Gresham College has been giving free public lectures since 1597. This tradition continues today with all of our five or so public lectures a week being made available for free download from our website.
  • PFW 2 - Topology Class pfw
  • AlgTop14: The Ham Sandwich theorem and the continuum In this video we give the Borsuk Ulam theorem: a continuous map from the sphere to the plane takes equal values for some pair of antipodal points. This is then used to prove the Ham Sandwich theorem (you can slice a sandwich with three parts (bread, ham, bread) with a straight planar cut s so that each slice is cut cut in two. Also we give an application to the ontinuum: the plane is different (not homeomorphic) 3 dimensional space. This is part of a beginner's course on Algebraic Topology, given by Assoc Prof NJ Wildberger of UNSW.
  • Swan Homeomorphisms Two object are called homeomorphic if they can be bi-continuosly deformed into each other. Here two swans are defromed together with their mirrorimages. The result is a torus for one swan and the union of two tori for the other. It is a deep topological theorem that these two can not be bi-continuously deformed into each other. Remark: The by-continuous deformation in this clip only starts after the one swan has put its beak under its feathers. Touching parts of a space that did not touch is NOT a bi-continuous deformation. This video was produced for a topology course at the Leibniz Universitat Hannover.
  • AlgTop14b: The Ham Sandwich theorem and the continuum (cont.) We discuss the Borsuk-Ulam theorem concerning a continuous map from the sphere to the plane, and the Ham Sandwich theorem. One application is to show that the two dimensional and three dimensional affine spaces are not homeomorphic. This is the second video in the 14th lecture of this beginner's course in Algebraic Topology, given by Assoc Prof NJ WIldberger at UNSW.
  • AlgTop2f: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle (last) This is the sixth and final video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry.
  • Non-homeomorphic Topological Spaces This clip shows two non homeomorphic topological spaces (a line segment and a circle). Proof: We have to show that there is no bi-continuos map from the line segment to the circle. If there was such a map we could remove a point of the line segment and the image of this point on the circle. The remaining pieces would then still be homeomorphic. On the other hand the first one has two components while the second one is still connected. Since connectedness is preserved by bi-continous maps we obtain a contradiction. Therefore a bi-continous map from the line to the circle can not exist. qed This Video was produces for a topology seminar at the Leibniz Universitaet Hannover. www-ifm.math.uni-
  • The fundamental Group of the Torus is abelian This video illustrates the proof of the Theorem in the title. The proof goes like this: Consider a rectangle. Then the path going up the left side of the rectangle and then along the top is homeomorphic to the path going first along the bottom and then up the right side. Gluing the rectancle to make a torus, this shows that going first around through the hole and then along the outside is homeomorphic to going first along the outside and then through the hole. Since these two path generate the fundamental group of the torus this proves that this group is abelan. qed Remark: This is a very special property. Many topological spaces have nonabelian fundamental groups. This video was produces for a topology seminar at the Leibniz Universitaet Hannover. www-ifm.math.uni-
  • The Alexander Sphere A path that is homoemorphic to a circle devides a compactified plane into two pieces (inside and outside). Arthur Schönflies proved in 1906 that in this situation the inside and outside are homoemorphic. To prove a similar statement in 3 dimensions was an open problem for many years. It was solved by James Alexander in 1928 who constructed the Alexander "Horned" Sphere, as illustrated in this video. The Alexander horned sphere is a topological space which is homeomorphic to a sphere, but inside and outside are not homeomorphic. This proves that there is no ***og of Schönflies Theorem in three dimensions. This Video was produces for a topology seminar at the Leibniz Universitaet Hannover. www-ifm.math.uni- This animation was #1 on our geometric animations advent calendar:
  • AlgTop14c: The Ham Sandwich theorem and the continuum (cont.) We discuss the Borsuk-Ulam theorem concerning a continuous map from the sphere to the plane, and the Ham Sandwich theorem. One application is to show that the two dimensional and three dimensional affine spaces are not homeomorphic. This is the third video in the 14th lecture of this beginner's course in Algebraic Topology, given by Assoc Prof NJ WIldberger at UNSW.
  • AlgTop2d: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle (cont.) This is the fourth video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry.
  • Topological Scars Chern-Simon Density in g=5 2d U(1) This simulation shows how the energy density (top plot) oscillates in vortices as they move. An moreover they leave distinctive topological scars as memories of their path (bottom). These topological scars would then be detectable by the Aharanov Bohm effect or violations in the fermion current in those regions. Note that phi*phi (second from bottom) and the magnetic force (second from top) show no signatures of the vortex movement.
  • AlgTop2: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle This is the first video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way, following Lemmermeyer and as explained by S. Shirali. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry. This lecture is part of a beginner's course in Algebraic Topology given by NJ Wildberger at UNSW.
  • AlgTop14d: The Ham Sandwich theorem and the continuum (last) We discuss the Borsuk-Ulam theorem concerning a continuous map from the sphere to the plane, and the Ham Sandwich theorem. One application is to show that the two dimensional and three dimensional affine spaces are not homeomorphic. This is the fourth and final video in the 14th lecture of this beginner's course in Algebraic Topology, given by Assoc Prof NJ WIldberger at UNSW.
  • AlgTop14a: The Ham Sandwich theorem and the continuum We discuss the Borsuk-Ulam theorem concerning a continuous map from the sphere to the plane, and the Ham Sandwich theorem. One application is to show that the two dimensional and three dimensional affine spaces are not homeomorphic. This is the first video in the 14th lecture of this beginner's course in Algebraic Topology, given by Assoc Prof NJ WIldberger at UNSW.
  • AlgTop2b: Homeomorphism and the group structure on a circle (cont.) This is the second video of the second lecture in this beginner's course on Algebraic Topology. We give the basic definition of homeomorphism between two topological spaces, and explain why the line and circle are not homeomorphic. Then we introduce the group structure on a circle, or in fact a general conic, in a novel way. This gives a gentle intro to the definition of a group. It also uses Pascal's theorem in an interesting way, so we give some background on projective geometry.
  • MetricSpaces 1.wmv Metric Spaces Part 1 Concepts and constructions: | Metric Subspaces | Neighborhoods of Points | Functions on Metric Spaces | Continuity | Homeomorphisms | Homeomorphic Spaces | Isometries | Isometric Spaces | Sets of Points | Open Balls | Euclidean Spaces as Metric Spaces | Differentials as Open Balls in Euclidean Space |

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about homeomorphic

  • “Buzz Blog The famous question, known as Poincare's Conjecture, can be worded succinctly in mathematical parlance like so: "every simply-connected closed three-manifold is homeomorphic to the three-sphere." ( Here's the official description from the Clay Institute—more on them later”
    — PhysicsCentral: Buzz Blog,

  • “Its central thesis is that the enormous dominance of theoretical physics by string Among these side effects are a lack of interest in (and arrogant dismissiveness of)”
    — The Trouble With Physics,

  • “Proving things not to be homeomorphic isn't really very easy either. our topological spaces are homeomorphic, our entities are equal, then”
    — Michi's blog " Blog Archive " Introduction to Algebraic,

  • “But translated to the putatively homeomorphic space R6, the map (a,b, So X4 must not be homeomorphic to R6, and X2 therefore not homeomorphic to R^3”
    — The Universe of Discourse : R3 is not a square,

  • “Because the function is continuous, by definition, the resultant image is homeomorphic to the closed interval on the reals. is homeomorphic (which it clearly is) should perhaps be distinguished from the question of whether the map”
    — James Tauber : Paths as homeomorphisms of the closed interval,

  • “Mathsputin solves the 'Poincaré Conjecture' Ok first, what is the Poincaré Conjecture? In mathematics, the Poincaré conjecture is a theorem about the characterization of the”
    — Mathsputin solves the 'Poincare Conjecture' : Science, disclose.tv

  • “But if they are not P.L. homeomorphic, then this procedure never terminates. to run another procedure which terminates if the two complexes are not P.L. homeomorphic”
    — Ian's home page, math.uic.edu

  • “ which a Judeo-Christian might find to be topologically homeomorphic to ash and dust particles, illustrating the Judeo-Christian css rules yourself, select this option and copy this stylesheet into your blog template. Don't use inline styles. copy and paste this stylesheet. into your blog template”
    — Clipmarks | Share This Clip,

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