gaelicised

share

Examples
gaelicised's examples

  • WiccaWeb and offers news and information, resources and forums, Pagan and Pagan friendly merchant listings and networking for the Wiccan and Pagan Community. To the south, the Brythonic Celtic place names were increasingly being Gaelicised. — “”,
  • He wrote under the Gaelicised version of his name Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil (also Seosamh MacCathmhaoil) He wrote under the Gaelicised version of his name Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil (also Seosamh MacCathmhaoil). — “Joseph Campbell facts - Freebase”,
  • Like the Norsemen in an earlier period, the Normans were being assimilated by the Nation—they were rapidly being Gaelicised. They had now been in the country for nearly two centuries, holding most of the lands they had seized against the Irish, who encompassed them on all sides. — “Gaelicised Of The Normans”,
  • : Gaelic and Gaelicized Ireland in the Middle Ages (9781843510031) by Nicholls, K. W. and a great selection of similar New, Used and Collectible Books available now at great prices. Gaelic and Gaelicised Ireland in the Middle Ages. — “9781843510031: Gaelic and Gaelicized Ireland in the Middle”,
  • Sons and Daughters of Erin and Irish Culture - A site designed to revive, foster and promote Irish cultural events, interests and sentiments. To collect and preserve Irish cultural traditions relating to any of the Irish peoples. This name has been gaelicised as Tomas which is pronounced 'Tu-MAWS'. — “Sons & Daughters of Erin- Information”,
  • THE SONG Dirty Old Townand the word "crack" have a lot in common. They both originated on the island to our east and were once considered thoroughly they soon became permanent fixtures in these parts: gradually going native, and even – in the case of "craic" – adopting Gaelicised name spelling. — “An Irishman's Diary - The Irish Times - Wed, Dec 02, 2009”,
  • Variations included Sanders and Sannock . The name is a Lowland Scots diminutive of the favourite Scottish first name Alexander (also current as Alasdair, Alistair in a Gaelicised form) from the last two syllables. The English commonly abbreviate the first two syllables into "Alec". — “Sawney”,
  • They became to a considerable extent Gaelicised, although not sufficiently Gaelicised to throw off their English allegiance. The Gaelic part of Ireland, on the other hand, experi-enced a development which increased its power of resistance to institutional change. — “Introduction to IRISH BATTLES by G.A. Hayes-McCoy (part 2)”,
  • Many of the invaders, including the lords, became Gaelicised. England "ruled" Ireland through Gaelicised nobles, such as the Fitzgeralds, the "Geraldines", until the 16th century. — “Ireland - from the Vikings to the French Revolution: A”,
  • Variations included Sanders and Sannock. The name is a Lowland Scots diminutive of the favourite Scottish first name Alexander (also current as Alasdair, Alistair in a Gaelicised form) from the last two syllables. The English commonly abbreviate the first two syllables into "Alec". — “Sawney - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News, Shopping”,
  • * gab * gabardine * gabardines * gabbard * gabbards * gabbart * gabbarts * gabbed * gabber * gabbers * gabbier * gabbiest * gabbiness * gabbinesses * gabbing * gabble * gabbled. — “Words that begin with letter 'G'?”,
  • The Old Irish personal name Amlaíb is a Gaelicised form of the Old Norse Óláfr, which was introduced into the British Isles by Even though these names were are of a different origin than the above Gaelicised Norse names, they were "totally confused" in the later Middle Ages with them.[4] In. — “Aulay - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • The Gaelicised form of Ashbourne is Cill Dhéagláin meaning Church of Saint Declan. During the 1970s, a series of estates at the southern end of the town were built to a design for a "Garden City" by Geoffrey Copcutt. — “Ashbourne Historical Society - Home”,
  • They may or may not have been Gaelicised, but undoubtedly many elements of Norse life were alluring to the Gael. with most of them being Gaelicised or with some Gaelic heritage. — “The Lordship of the Isles - The Society of the Isles”,
  • The Old Irish personal name Amlaíb is a Gaelicised form of the Old Norse Óláfr, which was Even though these names were are of a different origin than the above Gaelicised Norse names, they were "totally confused" in the later Middle Ages with them.4 In later times, Amalgaid, and Amhalghaidh, were. — “Aulay - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • There are few periods in the history of any nation as tumultuous as the late-six***th and early-seven***th centuries in Ireland. victory, cultural continuity among the Irish (and Gaelicised English), as well as the conflict over religion throughout Europe ensured that Ireland would remain a point. — “"In a Short Time There Were None Almost Left: The Success and”, digitalcommons.uri.edu
  • Especially the Norman or Christian names were gaelicised like Seán = Jean, Séamas = James, Searlas = Charles, other gaelicised names. many names of early Anglo-Norman immigrants. — “Names”, nualeargais.ie
  • They took the name of one of their forebearers, Jocelyn, which was Gaelicised to Goisdealbh, to become Mac Goisdealbhaigh. They took the name of one of their forebearers, Jocelyn, which was Gaelicised to Goisdealbh, to become Mac Goisdealbhaigh. — “Jocelyn sweater - Shop sales, stores & prices at ”,
  • Place names in Tiree are generally in Gaelic origin or are Gaelicised Norse. Place names on the Isle of Tiree are mainly of Gaelic origin or Gaelicised Norse dating back 800-1000 years and derived from Viking occupation. — “Isle of Tiree Place Names”,
  • Definition of bynames in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of bynames. Swetman) is an Irish surname derived from the Old English bynames of Swet, Sweta and Swete which are derived from the word 'Swete' (meaning 'popular') and survived into the medieval period, being later gaelicised to 'Suatman'. — “bynames - definition of bynames by the Free Online Dictionary”,
  • Gaelicised Bible Names by Undine. Pmed you with a few suggestions as to where you might get an Irish language Bible. There were no responses to this message. Because this message is archived you cannot respond to it. Home : Boards : Name Facts Message Board : Archives. — “Behind the Name: Message: "Re: Gaelicised Bible Names"”,

Videos
related videos for gaelicised

  • "The Emigrant" by Joseph Campbell Poem animation Heres a virtual movie of a recitation of a sad exquisite Irish poem "The Emigrant" by Joseph Campbell from the publication Irishry 1913 from The Oxford Book of Ireland. Joseph Campbell (July 15, 1879 -- June 1944) was an Irish poet and lyricist. He wrote as Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil (also Seosamh MacCathmhaoil), which has been Anglicised to Joseph McCahill on occasion. He is now remembered best for words he supplied to traditional airs, such as My Lagan Love and Gartan Mother's Lullaby; his verse was also set to music by Arnold Bax and Ivor Gurney. Joseph Campbell (July 15, 1879 -- June 1944) was an Irish poet and lyricist. He wrote under the Gaelicised version of his name Seosamh Mac Cathmhaoil (also Seosamh MacCathmhaoil). He is now remembered best for words he supplied to traditional airs, such as My Lagan Love and Gartan Mother's Lullaby; his verse was also set to music by Arnold Bax and Ivor Gurney. Kind Regards Jim Clark The car is yoked before the door, And time will let us dance no more. Come, fiddler, now, and play for me 'Farewell to barn and stack and tree.' To-day the fields looked wet and cold, The mearings gapped, the cattle old. Things are not what they used to be - 'Farewell to barn and stack and tree.' I go, without the heart to go, To kindred that I hardly know. Drink, neighbour, drink a health with me - 'Farewell to barn and stack and tree.' Five hours will see me stowed aboard, The gang-plank up, the ship unmoored. Christ grant no tempest shakes the sea ...
  • Monadh Liath range above Newtonmore Yet another Geal Charn and a further 3 Munros in a desolate high moorland hike; an epic walk to the former Munro summit of yes - yet another, Carn Bhac leading to the final summit of the day, the Munro, yes - yet another, Carn Dearg. "Darkness ia a message on the sea Light is like a life to the men below And when your beam is shone on me I get a magic glow Could it be the light that's in you? Could it my big, brown eyes? Why does my light go on shining? How come the darkest nights stay away? Moonlight is a message for the soul Spirit on a cross in a raging sea And when your gift is given slow You put a spell on me Could it be your winking eye, love Lightning up an emty road? Why does my light go on shining? How come the darkest nights stay away?" It was on 2 May 1916 that the Zeppelin L20 departed Germany under the command of Captain-Lieutenant Stabert on a raiding mission to Britain. The stalkers and their wives of Inverey heard the menacing roar above their village as the Zeppelin circled above, - a cottage skylight having caught the crew's attention. The skylight was hurriedly darkened as the cottage occupants feared getting bombed. But the Zeppelin continued on its way high above Ben MacDui, then across this mountain range the Monadh Liath before crossing the North Sea and eventually sinking in a Norwegian fjord. The aircraft was a length of 160m and 23m across with the inside silk holster containing 25000-kbm of gas that insured that the aircraft could carry a crew ...
  • 8-19-1505 Battle of Knockdoe The Battle of Knockdoe was a conflict between the Hiberno-Norman de Burghs (Burkes) and Anglo-Norman Fitzgeralds, along with their respective Irish allies. On the 19th of August 1504, the Parish of Lackagh (Irish Leacach) was the site of what appears to have been an unusually bloody conflict, arising from a dispute between Maelsechlainn mac Tadhg Ó Cellaigh (Mod. Irish Maoilseachlainn mac Thaidhg Uí Cheallaigh), lord of Hymanny (Ui Maine - Mod. Irish Uí Mháine) [1] and Ulick Burke (Uilleag de Búrca), the Clanricarde. Ulick Finn (Uilleag Fionn or Fair Ulick), as Burke was known locally, was an aggressive local magnate. He had become Chief of Clanrickarde in the year 1485, and sought to establish his authority over all Connacht, including County Mayo, where the other branch of the great De Burgo (Burke) family held power. Although both families were of Norman stock, the western de Burghs (or Burkes) were integrated into the Gaelic world, whereas the Fitzgeralds of the Pale, though Gaelicised, retained cultural, social and political links to England. The King's Deputy, Gerald Fitzgerald (Gearóid Mór), Earl of Kildare, became concerned that Ulick Burke's attempt at supremacy in Connacht could threaten his claim to be the paramount magnate in Ireland. He tried to persuade Ulick to acknowledge his authority by giving him his daughter Estacia in marriage. But Ulick Burke resisted all attempts to have his tenantry and power absorbed by the Earl of Kildare, forming an alliance ...

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about gaelicised

  • “The Modern Antiquarian website, based on Julian Cope's epic guidebook of the same name. The web's largest and a forum: The Brandsbutt ogham reads IRATADDOARENS. Inchyra =INEHHETESTIETD. One of the ones considered to be translated is the Lunnasting stone Shetland which has Nehton later gaelicised to”
    — Forums | Re: Ogam/Ogham Stones | The Modern ,

  • “Jonathan can be Gaelicised as in the Bible, but I think it's one of those names you can on the list of hits which results in more posts than one might expect on a music forum”
    — Oh, please help me,

  • “Please stop inviting people to read your "latest blog." It makes you sound like a moron and makes the pedants (and Gaelic) should worry about a native idiom for Internet when they improve upon Gaelicised-Anglified Greek for Television”
    — Sabrina Dent " It's a blog post, not a freakin' blog - Web,

  • “reply posted on 24-10-2008 @ 02:48 PM by Illusionsaregrander. Originally posted by pieman which is a gaelicised english word and which is an englishised gaelic word?”
    — Native Americans, Celts and Ancient Transatlantic Travel, page 5,

  • “LEO Deutsch-Englisch Wörterbuch I was also going to suggest shieling - it seems pretty accurate and as Gaelicised German says, it is a bona fide English word, albeit from ancient origin. My only doubt is as to whether the target audience would associate this word with an alpine snack bar”
    — LEO Forum,

  • “ blog - Ireland Family Document Retrieval Services, Irish Birth Records, Irish Baptism Records, Irish Marriage Records and Certificates”
    — The Ballycastle Blog: Irish Genealogy and More - Category,

  • “Few recent historical studies have been as influential, or as comprehensible as Robert Bartlett's The Making of Europe (Penguin, 2003). His erudite little vignette, The Hanged Man (Princeton, 2006) is a gem too”
    — Professor Bartlett on BBC | History Today,

  • “Orange Order, Protestant and Reformed Christian videos, parades, news and discussion with an Ulster-Scots / Northern Irish slant. Based in Northern Ireland / Ulster”
    — Orange Chronicle Forums / New Ireland Group, orange-

  • “News: Barry and I would like to welcome everyone to the new Ulster Heritage Forum. Were totally Gaelicised, i.e. became Gaelic speaking, Christian, adopted Gaelic folkways,”
    — Norse Gael Families; The Gall Gael,