dadaists

share

Examples
dadaists's examples

  • (See front cover) Inside the front door of Manhattan's Museum of Modern Art this week, oblong slabs of glass painted with black stripes revolved steadily under a six foot pair of red lips The same year Paris dadaists gave a "Festival" in the respectable Salle Gaveau Concert Hall. The program bore. — “Art: Marvelous & Fantastic - TIME”,
  • Definition of Dadaists in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of Dadaists. Pronunciation of Dadaists. Translations of Dadaists. Dadaists synonyms, Dadaists antonyms. Information about Dadaists in the free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. — “Dadaists - definition of Dadaists by the Free Online”,
  • Dada defined, with images of examples of works of Dadaists, great quotations, and links to other resources. Less a style than a zeitgeist, Dadaists typically produced art objects in unconventional forms produced by unconventional methods. — “Dada - Artlex”,
  • Encyclopedia article about Dadaists. Information about Dadaists in the Columbia Encyclopedia, Computer Desktop Encyclopedia, computing dictionary. — “Dadaists definition of Dadaists in the Free Online Encyclopedia”, encyclopedia2
  • Dadaism or Dada is a post-World War I cultural movement in visual art as well as At around the same time there had been a dadaist movement in Berlin. — “Dada - Definition”,
  • The Ultimate Dadaism - American History Online Reference Guide Dadaism. Dadaism or Dada is a post-World War I cultural movement in visual art as well as literature (mainly poetry), theatre and graphic design. — “The Ultimate Dadaism - American History Information Guide and”,
  • The International Dada Archives at the University of Iowa Libraries Information on Individual Dadaists. Dada Periodicals at Iowa (An article published in Books at Iowa) Send comments to timothy. — “International Dada Archive - The University of Iowa Libraries”, lib.uiowa.edu
  • Dadaism: Dada began as an anti-art movement, in the sense that it rejected the way art was appreciated and defined in contemporary art scenes. Founded in Zurich, Switzerland, the movement was a response to World War I. It had no unifying. — “Dadaism Art - Artists, Artworks and Biographies”,
  • Ironically, Dada became an influential movement in modern art, a commentary on order and the carnage Dadaists believed it wreaked. Ways Dadaism has been described "DADAIST DISGUST - Every product of disgust that is capable of becoming a. — “Dada”, schools-
  • Investigates the European art movement that occurred in Europe from 1916-1924. The Dada movement evolved into Surrealism in the 1920's. Chronological Listing of Dadaists. Use ctrl-F (PC) or command-F (Mac) to search for a name. — “Dada - Artcyclopedia”,
  • Dada or dada n. A European artistic and literary movement (1916-1923) that flouted conventional aesthetic and cultural values by producing works Dada or Dadaism, an avant‐garde movement of anarchic protest against bourgeois society, religion, and art, founded in 1916 in Switzerland by Tristan. — “Dada: Definition from ”,
  • 'Hydrometric demonstration of how to kill by temperature' Max Ernst. 1920. Collage and Collage with gouache and pencil on paper 'M2 430' Kurt Schwitters. 1922. Crayon and pasted. — “List of artworks, by title”,
  • Dadaism was the only significant artistic movement in Germany for Dadaism forced artists to declare openly their position .. . What did the dadaists do?. — “Dada - The Anti-War Art Movement”,
  • 43 is Merlin Mann's website about finding the time and attention to do your best creative work. Poets, dadaists, and word nerds: Rejoice. Merlin Mann | Jul 5 2005. Language Is A Virus Poets, dadaists, and word nerds: Rejoice. Poets, dadaists, and word. — “Poets, dadaists, and word nerds: Rejoice | 43 Folders”, 43
  • Dadaists. Definition from Wiktionary, the free dictionary. Jump to: navigation, search This page was last modified on 30 September 2010, at 17:30. Text is available under the. — “Dadaists - Wiktionary”,
  • Dadaists definition, the style and techniques of a group of artists, writers, etc., of the early 20th century who exploited accidental and incongruous effects in See more. — “Dadaists | Define Dadaists at ”,
  • Top questions and answers about Dadaists. Find 1987 questions and answers about Dadaists at Read more. — “Dadaists - ”,
  • Provides an overview of artists, events, and art that defined the European movement during the 20th century. dadaist poem || exquisite corpse || surrealist museum reviews | 4,408,213 visitors since 1998 || questions or information email. — “”,
  • User-generated article about Dada or Dadaism, the cultural movement through which the visual arts, literature, and theater rejected the prevailing standards through anti-art cultural works. — “Dada - Wikipedia”,
  • Like Surrealism and many other modern art movements, Dadaism reflected the collapse of the cherished ideals of Western society. important figure in this group was Iliazd, whose radical typographical designs visually echo the publications of the Dadaists. — “Dada - New World Encyclopedia”,
  • A) A combination of nonsense syllables in a sound-poem B) A collage created according to the laws of chance C) A performance in which the stage, props, costumes etc. are all violently destroyed D) The artist's suicide E) None of the above. — “According to the Dadaists, what was the greatest work of”,
  • Information on Individual Dadaists. The International Dada Archive focuses its collection All rights reserved, The International Dada Archive, Hosted by The University of Iowa. — “Dadaists - The International Dada Archive - The University of”, sdrc.lib.uiowa.edu

Videos
related videos for dadaists

  • The ABC's of DADA (1 of 3) The Dada movement was a protest against the barbarism of World War I, the bourgeois interests that Dada adherents believed inspired the war, and what they believed was an oppressive intellectual rigidity in both art and everyday society. Dada was an international movement, and it is difficult to classify artists as being from any one particular country, as they were constantly moving from one place to another. Dada thought that reason and logic had led people into the horrors of war, so the only route to salvation was to reject logic and embrace anarchy and irrationality. However, this could also be thought of as the logical side of anarchy and rejection of values and order; it is not irrational to embrace the systematic destruction of values, if one thinks them to be flawed. According to its proponents, Dada was not art - it was "anti-art". It was anti-art in the sense that Dadaists protested against the contemporary academic and cultured values of art. For everything that art stood for, Dada was to represent the opposite. Where art was concerned with aesthetics, Dada ignored aesthetics. If art were to have at least an implicit or latent message, Dada strove to have no meaning - interpretation of Dada is dependent entirely on the viewer. If art is to appeal to sensibilities, Dada is to offend. Ironically, Dada became an influential movement in modern art, a commentary on order and the carnage Dadaists believed it wreaked. Through their rejection of traditional culture ...
  • Entr'Acte modern version Entr'acte (1924): a film directed by René Clair.The cast included Francis Picabia, Erik Satie, Man Ray, and Marcel Duchamp. The Dadaists invented a new mode of production: instantanéisme. Soundtrack - music and voice : Sonia Pedretti (SoniaMagenta)
  • Untitled.jpg This is a short film made for my a-level art exam unit based on the theme 'boundaries'. The story is of a friendship/relationship and its constraints within modern society because of the sense of being and communication experienced through our technologically shrouded lives. :D attributed to the early post-modernist futurist inspired sophistry of the early 90s whom familiarised and developed the pre-raphaelite post cubist movement, most of which were actually modernist post-renaissance impressionist who specialised in arte povera and abstract expressionism in the style of neo-dadaists and mr.men books. would like to thank everyone involved and everyone i know because you may have, contrary to your awareness, inspired this movie. thanks, brap brap (where do we come from?!!) norf weezie, belgium and phillipino massive. :D please comment i want some critique
  • LTNO - Live in Montpellier 2002 Hubaut Emmanuel, aka the Earl of Eldorado, and William Lamy, aka Goliam, founded The Black Nipple at the age of 13 years in the loft of artist Joel Hubaut in Normandy in the early 1980s. The duo signed with French label Boucherie Productions to record the song "Crazy Horse" on the compilation "The Relief". Accompanied by Marcus on bass, The Black Nipples released their first album "Fauvism and sticky" in 1990 pieces rock / new wave Dadaists and crazy very well received by the press. Then they recorded the second album "Barrows" in 1991 with a new bassist Eduardo Leal de Gala. This album gives rise to a tour of sixty dates in Europe and Canada.
  • Draw Something 1 paper, pen, trying not to think of anything, just hover and float: my favorite way of drawing. Inspired by the automatic drawing sessions of the surrealists or was it the dadaists...
  • DADA Is A MOFO [echollage] Experimental Audio/Video Collage Soundscape Mashup Experience Another Cult of Listener Echollage by Shrooms! The Movie [excerpt from] http Dada For The 21st Century by Charles Rice Goff III The ABCs of Dada, An Alphabet of German DADAism Tom Hamilton & Bruce Eisenbeil, "Dusting Off Dada" DaDa Alex Caldiero Lecture [fragmented] Raymond Federman & Charles Bernstein, "Dada 2" Tristan Tzara interview Toby Lurie, "Dada" Andrew Chrystall & Bob Dobbs, "Nature Imitates Art" We [Dadaists] are often told that we are incoherent, but into this word people try to put an insult that it is rather hard for me to fathom. Everything is incoherent... There is no logic... The acts of life have no beginning and no end. Everything happens in a completely idiotic way. That is why everything is alike. Simplicity is called Dada. Any attempt to conciliate an inexplicable momentary state with logic strikes me as a boring kind of game... Like everything in life, Dada is useless... Perhaps you will understand me better when I tell you that Dada is a virgin microbe that penetrates with the insistence of air into all of the spaces that reason has not been able to fill with words or conventions. -- Tristan Tzara
  • Stefan Wolpe, String Quartet, ii Stefan Wolpe (August 25, 1902 April 4, 1972) was born in Berlin. He attended the Berlin Conservatory from the age of four***, and the Berlin Hochschule für Musik in 1920-1921. He studied composition under Franz Schreker and was also a pupil of Ferruccio Busoni. He also studied at the Bauhaus and met some of the dadaists, setting Kurt Schwitters's poem Anna Blume to music. In 1928, Wolpe's first opera, Zeus und Elida, premiered in Berlin. This soon was followed by two more operas in 1929, Schöne Geschichten and Anna Blume. The music Wolpe was writing between 1929 and 1933 was atonal, using Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. However, possibly influenced by Paul Hindemith's concept of Gebrauchsmusik (music that serves a social function) and, as an avid socialist, he wrote a number of pieces for worker's unions and communist theatre groups. For these he made his style more accessible, incorporating elements of jazz and popular music. His songs became popular, rivaling those of Hanns Eisler. When the ***s came to power in Germany, Wolpe, Jew and convinced communist, fled the country, passing through Romania and Russia en route to Austria in 1933-34, where he met and studied with Anton Webern. He later moved to Palestine in 1934-38, where he wrote simple songs for the kibbutzim. The music he was writing for concert performance, however, remained complex and atonal. Partly because of this, his contract was not renewed for the 1938-39 school year. In 1938, Wolpe moved ...
  • Symphonie Diagonale Viking Eggeling Viking Eggeling was a Swedish artist and experimental filmmaker. Mothlight was completed 1963
  • Let's Beat Dadaists Gone Wild - Cheese Soup Discount The bee's wind eats elbow air.
  • The Abracadada Egg-Beater Museum Another archival gem from the vaults! In the mid '80's I had the pleasure of illustrating rubber stamp designs for the Abracadada Rubber Stamp Company (Stamp Francisco). The company was owned and run by William Gaglione and his lovely wife Darlene, both who also happened to be the founders of the Bay Area Dadaists and major performance artists with a rich history of Dada / Performance art in San Francisco (I would later join the Bay Area Dadaists and wreak some DADA havoc, but that's another video series). Darlene is also a collector and archiver of everything Egg-Beaters (one of only 9 known collectors in the US), and her kitchen walls attest to that. From the first production egg-beater to a solid collection of child's play beaters, they are all represented here in all their one and two bladed glory! Join Darlene as she takes a break from the rubber stamp business to give us the full 3-egg tour of the 'beater collection.... This was shot for a video class around 1986 and was part of a series I did called 'OBSESSIONS OF HABIT'. This segment followed her husband William Gaglione in his unique Rubber Stamp Museum (also posted here on YouTube). Also part of this archived series is a collector of Barbie Dolls and a guy who was building a ship in his backyard - all to be uploaded soon. Enjoy.
  • Poetic Passageways Teaser Poetic Passageways: Synesthesia of Sound, Sight, and Movement 7:00 pm on Wednesday, April 20 and Thursday, April 21 $15/adult; $12 student/member Choreographer/dancer Olive Prince (Olive Prince Dance and Drexel University), composer/musician Christopher Farrell (Rit Mo Collective and Temple University), and other performers will marry movement, music, and the language of French Dadaists and Surrealists into a site-specific performance. Philadelphia's Magic Gardens 1020 South Street, Philadelphia PA, 19147
  • Dadaists Gone Wild Special Edition playthrough game: Dadaists Gone Wild Special Edition v1.5 by Malec2b (Alec Stamos) www.ultimate-
  • Claudia Drake 'Born and raised in a small town in the midwestern Us, Claudia Drake grew up in a time capsule. Her earliest memories are of playing with antique toys and oddities while sitting with her great-grandmother born 1901. That early soup of visual stimulus formed the foundation of her aesthetic and work. Drake's collages are victorian dreamscapes, jungian travels and digital hybrids, equal parts antique, modern and contemporary.' 'I love the complexity of a puzzle. My work is a process of piecing parts to uncover and create associations. Each new work is a puzzle to me, a series of interlocking forms that I fuse and rework digitally until I feel they fit. Antique engravings fascinate me, the legacy of prints past, their rich contrast and setails is the foundation of my work. Art history is the origin of my visual education. I'm self-trained through lessons learned from the early Surrealists and Dadaists, a love child of Ernst and Magritte. My work is born from that great legacy, collaging antique to a new hybrid whole.' (Claudia Drake) Musica: Amiina, 'Hemipode', dall'album 'AnimaminA' (2004).
  • The Patriot Station at WASPS Open Studios Weekend, Aberdeen, 4 & 5 Oct 2008 Performance by Peter McRae of The Patriot Station captured in stills sequence photographed by Matthew Wickham. 'The Patriot Station' is the latest piece in Peter McRae's exploration of the dynamic/kinetic connection between music and the visual arts. In parallel with the live art he is pursuing this connection through drawings on paper, in the vein of the 'automatic drawing' of cy twombly and the dadaists before him. The following spiel accompanies performances of 'The Patriot Station'. THEPATRIOTSTATION First Performed at a Breath of Fresh Air, a NEOS 2007 Event The officer pulls off the road and consults his site map for the exact location of the station, Patriot Station No. 31637, Finzean (fingin), Aberdeenshire, Scotland. He discovers hes actually as good as there, for he sees it, directly across a field, although the access appears to be via a track further on. Getting the field gate open was to prove to be as physical as anything he was to do on this day, and careful navigation was required through the rabbit burrows, often concealed in the uneven grass. It had rained throughout the journey to the Station, but the weather then cleared, magically, and the afternoon light on the distant, mauve hills was stupendous. The Station pedestal was in reasonably good shape: just a few daubs of paint were all that was needed. A few passing cars pulled up at the side of the road and the occupants spilled out onto the verge, to quietly observe the proceedings. There was quite a ...
  • Kenneth Patchen : Journal of Albion Moonlight (1941) Kenneth Patchen (December 13, 1911 - January 8, 1972) was an American poet and novelist. Though he denied any direct connection, Patchen's work and ideas regarding the role of artists paralleled those of the Dadaists, the Beats, and Surrealists. Patchen's ambitious body of work also foreshadowed literary art-forms ranging from reading poetry to jazz accompaniment to his late experiments with visual poetry (which he called his "picture poems"). This poem is from a book called The Journal Of Albion Moonlight (1941); the recording was made by Patchen at home and released on an album called From Albion Moonlight, which was not released until 1972, by Folkways, shortly after Patchen's death. NOTE: If anyone objects to this not-for-profit video due to copyright issues, please make contact.
  • Hox Vox - Dada (Cabaret Voltaire) - 03 - Otto Dix One of dadaists portraits from Dada (Cabaret Voltaire) LP. Wilhelm Heinrich Otto Dix (2 December 1891 -- 25 July 1969) was a German painter and printmaker, noted for his ruthless and harshly realistic depictions of Weimar society and the brutality of war. Along with George Grosz, he is widely considered one of the most important artists of the Neue Sachlichkeit. Song and videoclip are both released by Hox (Gianluca Missero) under a Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial-No Derivative Works 3.0 Unported License.
  • The *** Dadaists - Smiths Dance Cover SUPER SUPER SUPER GAY!!!!!!!!!!! and gay!
  • "Tape Music" (Social Measurement through Sound) Konsthall C(Film Version) Documentary Film Version: Konsthall C ,Horkarangen,Stockholm,14,Mars,2007 inspired by the dadaists' early sound poems,as well as Jean-jacques Lebel's Polyphonix,Linchiwei developped the idea of audience-body as instrument to the extremity,there is no more music assesories needed except the sound create by the audience themselfs! In this way Linchiwei developped a series of sound experiments "Body digital music","Body Interactive music","Body ***ogical music".... In "Tape Music- Sound Social Mesurements" Lin-chi-wei apply his experience of building electronic music patchs into the syncronizing of live chanting sounds, a very special form of "Phonetic Synthesis" is thus built , the reactive modes is considered to be the only content of this performance, as a form of social mesurement, together with it's "visible" sound . camera:Marcorder see more imformation on
  • Underrated Indie Games Part 33: Onwards Jetpack [Malec2b] After classic retro B-game platformer, Dadaists Gone Wild, I wasn't sure what to expect from this developer. It's a side-scrolling shmup with the central mechanic of switching characters before your jetpack juice runs out until you reach the end of each level. It's rough around the edges but well worth a go. www.ultimate-
  • Max Ernst Noveles Visuals Max Ernst (2 April 1891 1 April 1976) was a German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst is considered to be one of the primary pioneers of the Dada movement and Surrealism. Early life Ernst was born in Brühl, Germany, near Cologne. In 1909, he enrolled in the University at Bonn to study philosophy but soon abandoned the courses. He began painting that year, but never received any formal artistic training.[1] During World War I he served in the German army, which was a momentous interruption in his career as an artist. He stated in his autobiography, "Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914." [edit] Dada and Surrealism Max Ernst, Ubu Imperator, (1923), Musee National d'Art Moderne, Centre Pompidou, Paris, France After the war, filled with new ideas, Ernst, Jean Arp and social activist Alfred Grünwald, formed the Cologne, Germany Dada group. In 1918 he married the art historian Luise Straus — a stormy relationship that would not last. The couple had a son who was born in 1920, the artist Jimmy Ernst. (Luise died in Auschwitz in 1944.[2]) In 1919 Ernst visited Paul Klee and created paintings, block prints and collages, and experimented with mixed media. In 1922, he joined fellow Dadaists André Breton, Gala, Tristan Tzara, Paul Éluard at the artistic community of Montparnasse.[1] Constantly experimenting, in 1925 he invented a graphic art technique called frottage, which uses pencil rubbings of objects as a source of images. The next year he ...
  • INDIE FREE FESTIVAL no17/Lost Bodies live: SOLINES/13OCT2007 Void Network (Theory,Utopia,Empathy,Ephemeral Arts) presents INDIE FREE FESTIVAL no.17 temporary autonomous ecstatic zone saturday 13 october / Pedion Areos (Athens central Park) from 16.00 until next morning stage 1 [underground rock] stage 2 [ambientrancedelica experience] the video is from stage 1 / a rock anti consumerism-antiwork anticapitalistic anthem of the Greek underground "Solines" (the tubes) by one of the most important dadaists of Greece :The Lost Bodies more info about Lost Bodies in www.lostbodies.gr more info about Indie Free Festival and Void Network in
  • Dadaist Gone Wild 2 Trailer Trailer for the game I'm working on. It's a sequel to Dadaists Gone Wild called Dadaists Gone Wild 2: Realistic Adventures of a MAN.
  • Multi Talented Doug Dangermon Age: Younger than Jagger, older than the Jonas Brothers. Bands: Not Here (/nothereband) and The Jugadelics (). Formerly, the rhythmic backbone for Hoosegow and Theater of the Intuitive Improvisation. Next gig: The Spirit of Waterbury Festival, Oct. 24 (rain date: Oct. 25) on the Waterbury Green. Music style: Not Here plays eclectic, high energy, original rhythmic rock. The Jugadelics play Americana roots and original Connecticut jug music. Armed with: Ludwig drum kit, a pair of Latin percussion timbales, a bi-level washboard rig and an arooo-ga horn. Wishes he had: Keith Moons arms. First record bought: The Jimi Hendrix Experience, Are You Experienced?. First concert: The Earth Peoples Party hosted by Wavy Gravy and the Hog Farm Commune, at Yales old campus, 1971. The Rockets and Jasper Wrath played. My dad took me by mistake, thinking it was something educational. Best show seen at the New Haven Coliseum: Frank Zappa and The Mothers Of Invention. Zappa shouted I love the sound of a hockey rink. Listening to: Matisyahu, Ziggy Marley, Soca Bonfire and WPKN, 89.5 FM. While cleaning: Cake, Fuggs, James Brown. Song that changed his life: The Doors, The End (the long version). First notes: At age 13, I played my Bar Mitzvah. It has always been my belief that drums is the mother tongue. We should all drum for peace. Buy him a drink: Cabo Wabo tequila with a Stella Artois as a chaser. Last thing he chugged: The bottom of a bottle of mezcal, with the ...
  • Remix Rebels The remix as rebellion has a tradition that dates back to the Dadaists, William S. Burroughs, the cultural jammers and beyond
  • SUPREMUS - DADAISM "SUPREMUS" (KIEV) - "Dadaism" (26.06.2010). Event dedicated to works of Dadaists in Dnipropetrovsk central library. We used fragments of the film "Entacte" (France, 1924) by Rene Claire , music by Erik Satie.
  • Summer 2010 Closing Piece Part #1 From the Summer 2010 performances at the Manhattan Arts Center in June. The target story for summer 2010 is the story of Aladdin. The Dadaists (Germany and France 1916-1924): In the wake of the devastating violence of World War I the Dadaists felt all logic had left the world and the old artistic institutions, which had betrayed them by allowing such violence, were ripe for being torn down. They rejected logic and rationality and embraced disorder as the nature of the world. They aimed to demystify the role of artists by claiming that anyone can be an artist and anything can be art. Performances do not include, or intend to include, a clear message, or any meaning at all and are often created using chance practices, as was this piece, created by the whole company in a series of dada chance exercises and improvisational physical exercises.
  • Max Ernst Max Ernst (2 April 1891 1 April 1976) was a German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst is considered to be one of the primary pioneers of the Dada movement and Surrealism. After the war, filled with new ideas, Ernst, Jean Arp and social activist Alfred Grünwald, formed the Cologne, Germany Dada group. In 1918 he married the art historian Luise Straus — a stormy relationship that would not last. The couple had a son who was born in 1920, the artist Jimmy Ernst. (Luise died in Auschwitz in 1944.) In 1919 Ernst visited Paul Klee and created paintings, block prints and collages, and experimented with mixed media. In 1922, he joined fellow Dadaists André Breton, Gala, Tristan Tzara, Paul Éluard at the artistic community of Montparnasse.Constantly experimenting, in 1925 he invented a graphic art technique called frottage, which uses pencil rubbings of objects as a source of images. The next year he collaborated with Joan Miró on designs for Sergei Diaghilev. With Miró's help, Ernst pioneered grattage in which he troweled pigment from his canvases. He also explored with the technique of decalcomania which involves pressing paint between two surfaces. Max Ernst's life and career are the subject of Peter Schamoni's 1991 documentary Max Ernst. Dedicated to the art historian Werner Spies, it was assembled from interviews with Ernst, stills of his paintings and sculptures, and the memoirs of his wife Dorothea Tannning and son Jimmy. The 101-minute ...
  • Summer 2010 Closing Piece Part #2 From the Summer 2010 performances at the Manhattan Arts Center in June. The target story for summer 2010 is the story of Aladdin. The Dadaists (Germany and France 1916-1924): In the wake of the devastating violence of World War I the Dadaists felt all logic had left the world and the old artistic institutions, which had betrayed them by allowing such violence, were ripe for being torn down. They rejected logic and rationality and embraced disorder as the nature of the world. They aimed to demystify the role of artists by claiming that anyone can be an artist and anything can be art. Performances do not include, or intend to include, a clear message, or any meaning at all and are often created using chance practices, as was this piece, created by the whole company in a series of dada chance exercises and improvisational physical exercises.
  • A Tribute to Schwitters A tribute to the fellow dadaists and all that they represent. This one goes out to Schwitters whose sound poem I remixed in order for everyone to better feel the emotions behind the words and better understand the fallacy of words.
  • Oil paintings of western masters- episode 03- Max Ernst Max Ernst (2 April 1891 1 April 1976) was a German painter, sculptor, graphic artist, and poet. A prolific artist, Ernst is considered to be one of the primary pioneers of the Dada movement and Surrealism. Ernst was born in Brühl, Germany, near Cologne. In 1909, he enrolled in the University at Bonn to study philosophy but soon abandoned the courses. He began painting that year, but never received any formal artistic training. During World War I he served in the German army, which was a momentous interruption in his career as an artist. He stated in his autobiography, "Max Ernst died the 1st of August, 1914." After the war, filled with new ideas, Ernst, Jean Arp and social activist Alfred Grünwald formed the Cologne, Germany Dada group. In 1918 he married the art historian Luise Straus—a stormy relationship that would not last. The couple had a son who was born in 1920, the artist Jimmy Ernst. (Luise died in Auschwitz in 1944.[2]) In 1919 Ernst visited Paul Klee and created paintings, block prints and collages, and experimented with mixed media. In 1922, he joined fellow Dadaists André Breton, Gala, Tristan Tzara, and Paul Éluard at the artistic community of Montparnasse.[1] Constantly experimenting, in 1925 he invented a graphic art technique called frottage (see Surrealist techniques), which uses pencil rubbings of objects as a source of images. He also created another technique called 'grattage' in which paint is scraped across canvas to reveal the imprints of the ...
  • Tape Music Puli - Social measurement through sound (for 6 channel Installation) Installation Version 1.Tao-Yuan Elementary School/5,Dec,07/ 1min 2.Puli City Hall/5,Dec,07/ 1min 3.Creativity Workshop in Chi-Nan University / 21,Nov,07/ 1min 4.Di-Mu(Mother earth) Temple/4,Dec,07/ 1min 5.Boyo Social Welfare Fondation / 17,Nov,07/ 1min Inspired by dadaists' and futurists' sound poetry,‭Folk Machine‭turns the audience body into electronic musical instruments‭! Based on the tape with meaningless phonetics as long as 120 meters,"Tape Music" ‭‭travelled throughout the world for extremely diversed communities,this game start with no previous explaination and force audience to react to it, ‬according to the existing social context ,as well as the psychological and acoustic qualities of the space , ‬each element demonstrates their proper existence through the way sound is made,which makes each‭ ‬scene distinctive with it's proper beauty‭.‬ see also : for other works from "electronic art brut" series.
  • Stevan Wolpe, 'From here on farther' Concerto for Violin, Clarinet, Bass Clarinet and Piano 'Comet-like radiance, conviction, fervent intensity, penetrating thought on many levels of seriousness and humor, combined with breathtaking adventurousness and originality, marked the inner and outer life of Stefan Wolpe, as they do his compositions.' Elliot Carter Stefan Wolpe (August 25, 1902 April 4, 1972) was a German-born composer. Wolpe was born in Berlin. He attended the Berlin Conservatory from the age of four***, and the Berlin Hochschule für Musik in 1920-1921. He studied composition under Franz Schreker and was also a pupil of Ferruccio Busoni. He also studied at the Bauhaus and met some of the dadaists, setting Kurt Schwitters's poem Anna Blume to music. In 1928, Wolpe's first opera, Zeus und Elida, premiered in Berlin. This soon was followed by two more operas in 1929, Schöne Geschichten and Anna Blume.[1] The music Wolpe was writing between 1929 and 1933 was atonal, using Arnold Schoenberg's twelve-tone technique. However, possibly influenced by Paul Hindemith's concept of Gebrauchsmusik (music that serves a social function) and, as an avid socialist, he wrote a number of pieces for worker's unions and communist theatre groups. For these he made his style more accessible, incorporating elements of jazz and popular music. His songs became popular, rivaling those of Hanns Eisler. When the ***s came to power in Germany, Wolpe, Jew and convinced communist, fled the country, passing through Romania and Russia en route to Austria in 1933-34, where he met and ...
  • "Tape Music" (Social Measurement through Sound)Cité des Arts(Film Version) Film Version: Inspired by the dadaists' early sound poems,as well as Jean-jacques Lebel's Polyphonix,Linchiwei developped the idea of audience-body as instrument to the extremity,there is no more music assesories needed except the sound create by the audience themselfs!In this way Linchiwei developped a series of sound experiments "digital music"," Interactive music" and "***ogical music"....In ""Tape Music" Social Measurement through Sound" Lin-chi-wei apply his experience of building electronic music patchs into the syncronizing of live chanting sounds, a very special form of "Phonetic Synthesis" is thus built , the reactive modes is considered to be the only content of this performance, as a form of social mesurement, together with it's "visible" sound . see more imformation on
  • What We Saw at the Stewart-Colbert Rally to Restore Sanity Reason.tv was on hand for the Rally to Restore Sanity And/Or Fear hosted by Jon Stewart and Stephen Colbert at the National Mall in Washington on Saturday, October 30, 2010. The crowd was huge, the weather fine, the signs memorable, and the people...well, let's just say they were there too. Some were apolitical and just out for a fun day, some were big fans of Comedy Central's best-known personalities, some were inadvertent dadaists, and more than a few defined sanity strictly in terms of heartily agreeing with themselves. Approximately 6 minutes long. Shot and edited by Jim Epstein and Meredith Bragg, with assistance from Josh Swain. Interviews by Michael C. Moynihan and Nick Gillespie. With help from June Arunga. Go to reason.tv for HD, iPod and audio versions of this video and subscribe to Reason.tv's YouTube channel to receive automatic notification when new material goes live. Go to http for our coverage of all the recent DC rallies. Check out for more articles and links.
  • KWA® Nurillogikal "Like the brave Dadaists of yesteryear, KWA sculpts and experiments with modern media to express his artistic and political philosophies. In fact, KWA's commonality with Dada is art as a kind of anti-art. In more words, a defiant affirmation of originality often posed as a question, in so being that the artistic tools used for creation are traditional, but the context in which the work is placed gives the idea of the art in question a new and sometimes unique meaning. In this way, the art of KWA resembles the visual work of Marcel Duchamp and Andy Warhol." "As a title, "Neurillogikal"- (or "Nurillogikal" depending on KWA's mood)- is a curious portmanteau that implies divergent meanings within itself; neuro, as in relation to the brain, logic, illogic, illness, and a protrusive "k" used in the same hard line Germanic way that Kafka applied it." Stafford Davis, Curator I/O\I () An abstract composition designed as antidote to the social anomie and psychological anxiety generated by the ubiquitous use of consumerism and fear by Mass Media. Ironically the artist utilizes Mass Media's own tools (radio/television/satellite... frequencies) toward this end. Complementing these defiant Ultrasonics, KWA has embedded one of his trademark "downward spirals" into this mixed media montage.
  • Dadaism to Surrealism A more artistic than informative way of how dadaism came around and evolved into surrealism, Basicly surrealism was born from the dadaists that wanted to make money from there work, if i remember my teacher correctly....
  • PINK/GLUE We Are Dadaists
  • Silence - New Dadaists (1).3gp Silence by the New Dadaists.
  • Sleepytime Gorilla Museum - Salamander (11-20-09 San Francisco) Footage from last nights show... absolutely amazing. Out of the literally hundreds of bands Ive seen live, Sleepytime still never ceases to amaze me with their show. I cannot think of a show more memorable and amazing than Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. Coming in close second is the Residents and some of Mike Patton's amazing projects. None of them are even close the the caliber of musicianship this whole band displays nonstop... Amazing vocal harmonies, Home-made instrumentation and percussions, and some of the darkest melodies and songs ever written. ----From Wikipedia---- According to their extensive liner notes for Grand Opening and Closing, their official history and repeated in interviews, the name "Sleepytime Gorilla Museum" comes from a small group of Dadaists, Futurists, and artists named the Sleepytime Gorilla Press who owned and operated what they called a "museum of the future" which was "anti-artifact, non-historical and closed."[2] The "museum" opened on June 22, 1916 (the same date as the bands' first concert, 83 years later). The exhibit was a fire which caused wide chaos and confusion. The following day the museum was closed (hence the name of the first album). The name itself apparently comes from a poem called "Of the Future Hides the Past," written by Museum members Lala Rolo and Ikk Ygg. Their live performances have featured puppet shows, pseudo-scientific scholarly presentations, and performances by members of the Butoh group inkBoat. The band uses many ...
  • Sleepytime Gorilla Museum - Angle of Repose (11-20-09 San Francisco) Footage from last nights show... absolutely amazing. Out of the literally hundreds of bands Ive seen live, Sleepytime still never ceases to amaze me with their show. I cannot think of a show more memorable and amazing than Sleepytime Gorilla Museum. Coming in close second is the Residents and some of Mike Patton's amazing projects. None of them are even close the the caliber of musicianship this whole band displays nonstop... Amazing vocal harmonies, Home-made instrumentation and percussions, and some of the darkest melodies and songs ever written. ----From Wikipedia---- According to their extensive liner notes for Grand Opening and Closing, their official history and repeated in interviews, the name "Sleepytime Gorilla Museum" comes from a small group of Dadaists, Futurists, and artists named the Sleepytime Gorilla Press who owned and operated what they called a "museum of the future" which was "anti-artifact, non-historical and closed."[2] The "museum" opened on June 22, 1916 (the same date as the bands' first concert, 83 years later). The exhibit was a fire which caused wide chaos and confusion. The following day the museum was closed (hence the name of the first album). The name itself apparently comes from a poem called "Of the Future Hides the Past," written by Museum members Lala Rolo and Ikk Ygg. Their live performances have featured puppet shows, pseudo-scientific scholarly presentations, and performances by members of the Butoh group inkBoat. The band uses many ...
  • Dadaists Gone Wild 2 Second Trailer Second trailer for my upcoming game Dadaists Gone Wild 2: Realistic Adventures of a MAN.
  • The Abracadada Rubber Stamp Museum Another archival gem from the vaults! In the mid '80's I had the pleasure of illustrating rubber stamp designs for the Abracadada Rubber Stamp Company (Stamp Francisco). The company was owned and run by William Gaglione and his lovely wife Darlene, both who also happened to be the founders of the Bay Area Dadaists and major performance artists with a rich history of Dada / Performance art in San Francisco (I would later join the Bay Area Dadaists and wreak some DADA havoc, but that's another video series). William was also a collector and archiver of everything rubber stamp, and his basement housed a makeshift rubber stamp museum supreme. It was a rare treat for anyone who happened by the house during 'operating' hours and got the e-ticket tour from William himself! This was a short video I shot of William in his Rubber Stamp Museum giving the lens the full rubber stamp experience, shot for a video class and around 1986, it was part of a series I did called 'OBSESSIONS OF HABIT' and included many weird and wonderful collections (and the people who collected them). William's wife Darlene collected egg-beaters (!) and her segment is also on YouTube. Also part of this series is a collector of Barbie Dolls (one of each, from the first to the most current) and a guy who was building a 4-crew ship in his backyard - all to be uploaded soon. Enjoy.

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about dadaists

  • “When the Dadaists asked these questions they gave rise to Surrealism. Perhaps it was Compared to Baudelaire's Paris, or the Dadaist's Zurich, the 21st century metropolis is a”
    — Harold's Sketchbook" Blog Archive " The Forest of Images,

  • “The Dee method for Rock Band styling take cues from disparate sources including: the collage techniques of the Dadaists, the stitching style of Doctor Victor Frankenstein and good old fashion bulk drawing techniques of classic American animation Search Blog”
    — Dee Art Process // Blog // Rock Band®,

  • “RetroCollage Art: The Metaphysical Art of Eric Edelman Keaton made the film in 1928, at the same time as the Dadaists and Surrealists in Europe were experimenting with both static and dynamic collage”
    — RetroCollage Art,

  • “The art world's waited over 90 years for a London DaDa expression. By 1920, DaDa had as its major international centres; Paris, Zurich, Barcelona, Hanover, Berlin and New York . but curiously no London movement. LONDON DADA, founded in 2005”
    — 691. LONDON DADA online gallery / periodical,

  • “At the UK Festival Feedback Forum threads awards at the O2 Arena in London tonight, the great and good of the Festival Feedback Forum thread world wi Dadaist's near monopoly may enable it to insist on exclusivity deals for bands and will make it harder for smaller Festival Feedback Forum threads to”
    — Rate My Comedown sale sends shiver through Festival Feedback,

  • “Open Space is the blog of the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art There is, lingering temptingly in the archives, a story too good to keep to ourselves: the infamous mystery of the "missing" artwork donated in 1972 by the Bay Area Dadaists”
    — SFMOMA | OPEN SPACE " 2008 " August,

  • “But I started reading about the dadaists and bauhaus artists--producing between 1917 and I now politely refer the boomers to the dadaists, who seem to have left no artistic stone”
    — The Pipeline at IAC - WATERPLANET Topics and Comments,

  • “We live in our cosily created reality bubble. It is time to burst it and see what happens”
    Dadaists " Lefteris Heretakis – The Visual Communicator,

  • “ early twentieth century typographic experiments of the Futurists, Dadaists and in particular his hero the Russian constructivist by the way – you might be interessted in this: http://blog.6”
    — Genius (just) " /blog,

  • “Regardless of the outcome, the intellectual lifecycle of a design is far more intriguing Futurists, Expressionists, Constructivists, Dadaists, Surrealists and Modernists, among”
    — The YouWorkForThem Blog " Willi Kunz,

Keywords
related keywords for dadaists