contrapuntally

share

Examples
contrapuntally's examples

  • We found 29 dictionaries with English definitions that include the word contrapuntal: contrapuntal: American Heritage Dictionary of the English Language [home, info] contrapuntal: Merriam-Webster's Online Dictionary, 11th Edition [home,. — “Definitions of contrapuntal - OneLook Dictionary Search”,
  • : Contrapuntal Edward Said, Contrapuntal Hermeneutics and the Book of Job: Power, Subjectivity and Responsibility in Biblical Interpretation (BibleWorld) by Alissa Jones Nelson (Paperback - Mar. 31, 2011). — “: Contrapuntal”,
  • Week 1: Contrapuntal Techniques. There is a venerable tradition in western classical music of generating new Every three-note segment of Webern's concerto is a contrapuntal derivative (transposed) of the pitches G, B, and B-flat. — “Lesson 1 for "Form & ***ysis"”, j***.ucc.nau.edu
  • Definition of word from the Merriam-Webster Online Dictionary with audio pronunciations, thesaurus, Word of the Day, and word games. Origin of CONTRAPUNTAL. Italian contrappunto counterpoint, from Medieval Latin contrapunctus — more at counterpoint. First Known. — “Contrapuntal - Definition and More from the Free Merriam”, merriam-
  • This page is about contrapuntal theory. A brief essay on the development of the contrapuntal dimension on western music, focused on the problem of vertical consonance and dissonance is complemented with a comprehensive glossary and a list of the. — “The Counterpoint Page”,
  • In each era, contrapuntally organized music writing has been subject to rules, sometimes strict. A: contrapuntal: 1 : POLYPHONIC 2 : of, relating to, or marked by counterpoint - con tra pun tal ly /-t&l-E/ adverb counterpoint: 1 a : one or more independent melodies added above or below. — “Contrapuntal - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News”,
  • Skeptical photographer who travels for work far too much, loves acting and directing AmDram () contrapuntal. Tonight is second of three rehearsals this week for Family Planning. It's exhausting but fun - we've a great fun cast. 8:23 AM Mar 10th via TweetDeck. — “Martin (contrapuntal) on Twitter”,
  • In any case, here is my term project for the Prolog Programming course, Contrapuntal Composer. Depending on initial parameters, it can write a fugue, a rondo, or any other contrapuntal form. — “Contrapuntal Composer”, alumni.media.mit.edu
  • Definition of contrapuntal from Webster's New World College Dictionary. Meaning of contrapuntal. Pronunciation of contrapuntal. Definition of the word contrapuntal. Origin of the word contrapuntal. — “contrapuntal - Definition of contrapuntal at ”,
  • In each era, contrapuntally organized music writing has been subject to rules, sometimes strict. In musical composition, contrapuntal techniques are important for enabling composers to generate musical ironies that serve not only to intrigue listeners into listening more intently to. — “Counterpoint - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • contrapuntal adj. Music Of, relating to, or incorporating counterpoint. [From obsolete Italian contrapunto , counterpoint : Italian contra. — “contrapuntal: Definition from ”,
  • Online Information article about CONTRAPUNTAL FORMS free and fairly contrapuntal harmony in three or more parts, and so arrange it that it remains correct when the parts are brought in one by one, that very few composers seem to have realized that any further artistic See also:. — “CONTRAPUNTAL FORMS - Online Information article about”,
  • The adjective shows this Latin source more transparently: contrapuntal. The late Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach wrote most of his music exploiting counterpoint, and explicitly and systematically explored the full range of contrapuntal possibilities in such works as the Art of Fugue. — “BIGpedia - Counterpoint - Encyclopedia and Dictionary Online”,
  • The adjective shows this Latin source more transparently: contrapuntal. The late Baroque composer Johann Sebastian Bach wrote most of his music exploiting counterpoint, and explicitly and systematically explored the full range of contrapuntal possibilities in such works as the Art of Fugue. — “Counterpoint - Definition”,
  • Definition of contrapuntal in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of contrapuntal. Pronunciation of contrapuntal. Translations of contrapuntal. contrapuntal synonyms, contrapuntal antonyms. Information about contrapuntal in the free online English. — “contrapuntal - definition of contrapuntal by the Free Online”,
  • CONTRAPUNTAL FORMS, in Music. The forms of music may be considered in two aspects, the texture of the music from moment to moment, and the shape of the musical design as a whole. The "contrapuntal" forms, then, are historically the earliest and aesthetically the simplest in music; the. — “Contrapuntal forms - LoveToKnow 1911”, 1911
  • The adjectival form contrapuntal shows this Latin source more transparently. how to compose, using counterpoint—specifically, the contrapuntal style as practised by Palestrina in the. — “Counterpoint - New World Encyclopedia”,
  • Watch the latest music videos, video interviews, live sessions, music video news and band walk-ons from around the globe Watch the latest Contrapuntal videos, music videos, video interviews, live music sessions, music news and bands onstage around the globe. — “Free Music Videos, Video Interviews, Music Video News, Live”,
  • contrapuntal (comparative more contrapuntal, superlative most contrapuntal) Retrieved from "http:///wiki/contrapuntal" Categories: English adjectives | Music | Latin derivations. — “contrapuntal - Wiktionary”,

Videos
related videos for contrapuntally

  • Paul Hindemith - String Quartet No. 5, II String Quartet No.5, Op. 32 (1923) I. Lebhafte Halbe II. Sehr langsam, aber immer fliessend III. Kleiner Marsch -- Passacaglia -- Fugato. So schnell wie möglich The Danish Quartet The Amar Quartet was founded in 1920 (with Hindemith as violist) for the express purpose of premiering the composer's String Quartet No. 3 in C major, Op. 16, but continued on through the decade as one of the finest exponents of the modern string quartet literature. Hindemith's subsequent two quartets were composed for the Amar Quartet. The String Quartet No. 5, Op. 32, was written in 1923. Fugal elements are the most prominent feature of this virtuosic score. After a four-note gesture that functions as a motivic cell for the entire work, the first movement launches into a fugue of ferocious energy, polytonal and extremely dissonant, with virtuosic writing and highly resourceful disposition of the four instruments. The middle section arrives abruptly: a rhapsodic interlude with textures of great beauty and complex harmony, in which fugal elements continue to drive the rhetoric. The opening section returns via an ingenious conception wherein the violins skirl contrapuntally in close intervals and high range as viola and cello attempt through repeated shoutings of the four-note cell to end the interlude. The lower strings finally succeed in wresting control of the music, and the movement ends with a strict fugue on the main theme. Rhythmic superimpositions dominate the second movement, a sustained ...
  • "Flexible Desires" Joanne Chang, piano. Tenri Cultural Institute, New York. Flexible Desires, for solo piano, was commissioned by pianist Joanne Chang with funds provided by the City University of New York. The work is cast in a single movement and presents two sets of very contrasting materials; the first one is harsh, rhythmic, dissonant and mostly contrapuntally based, while the second is lyrical, smoother, consonant and mostly harmonically based. The whole work grows organically from the development and the superimposition of these two thematic ideas, and also showcases that alternation and tension between tonality and atonality that is an increasingly recurrent feature of my music. The title is a reference to the fact that in music (as well as in life in general) the desire toward consonance always has to come to terms with the desire toward dissonance and vice-versa.
  • Bach Double Concerto : Isaac Stern & Shlomo Mintz (Part 1) Bach Concerto in D minor for 2 Violins Isaac Stern & Shlomo Mintz (Part1)
  • Paul Hindemith - String Quartet No.5, III String Quartet No.5, Op. 32 (1923) I. Lebhafte Halbe II. Sehr langsam, aber immer fliessend III. Kleiner Marsch -- Passacaglia -- Fugato. So schnell wie möglich The Danish Quartet The Amar Quartet was founded in 1920 (with Hindemith as violist) for the express purpose of premiering the composer's String Quartet No. 3 in C major, Op. 16, but continued on through the decade as one of the finest exponents of the modern string quartet literature. Hindemith's subsequent two quartets were composed for the Amar Quartet. The String Quartet No. 5, Op. 32, was written in 1923. Fugal elements are the most prominent feature of this virtuosic score. After a four-note gesture that functions as a motivic cell for the entire work, the first movement launches into a fugue of ferocious energy, polytonal and extremely dissonant, with virtuosic writing and highly resourceful disposition of the four instruments. The middle section arrives abruptly: a rhapsodic interlude with textures of great beauty and complex harmony, in which fugal elements continue to drive the rhetoric. The opening section returns via an ingenious conception wherein the violins skirl contrapuntally in close intervals and high range as viola and cello attempt through repeated shoutings of the four-note cell to end the interlude. The lower strings finally succeed in wresting control of the music, and the movement ends with a strict fugue on the main theme. Rhythmic superimpositions dominate the second movement, a sustained ...
  • When did you learn to play piano? Two boys (Josh and Klee) find a foreign piano in their foyer. Upon the acknowledgement of the instrument, Josh realises that there happens to be some sheet music in his grasp. Although he is aware that he lacks the ability to play such an instrument, he sits, assuming no one is around, and after a bit of noodling, Klee hears a noise from his dwelling. So he comes to investigate. Alas! 'Tis Josh noodling. Then Klee also sits, and from there, magic takes place.......... Lyrics: So long mom, I'm off to drop the bomb So don't wait up for me. But while you swelter down there in your shelter- You can see me. On your TV. While we're attacking frontally, Watch brinkally and huntally Describing contrapuntally The cities we have lost. No need for you to miss a minute of the agonising holocaust! Little Johnny Jones he was a US pilot And no shrinking violet was he! He was mighty proud when WWIII was declared, he wasn't scared no siree!!!!!! And this is what he said on his way to Armageddon!; So long mom, I'm off to drop the bomb So don't wait up for me. But though I may roam I'll come back to my home. All though it may be. A pile of debris. Remember mommy, I'm off to get a commie- so send me a salami and try to smile somehow. I'll look for you when the war is over... And hour and a half from now!!!!!!!!
  • Eckhardt-Gramatté - Piano Sonata No. 6 [Marc-André Hamelin] Piano Sonata No. 6, E. 130 "Drei Klavierstücke" (1951-52) I. For the left hand alone: Prestissimo, e molto preciso [0:00] II. For the right hand alone: Lustig und mit Witz [3:36] III. For both hands: Vivo assai e marcato [8:20] The sixth piano sonata by Russian, later Canadian, composer, virtuoso pianist and violinist Sophie-Carmen Eckhardt-Gramatté (1899-1974). "I was born for music." Sophie-Carmen Eckhardt-Gramatté made this comment following her debut as a pianist and violinist in Chicago. Despite numerous struggles against professional and social injustice, Eckhardt-Gramatté forged a brilliant career in composition and performance over the course of the 20th century. Her six piano sonatas (which can be found on my channel) are a testament both to her extraordinary musical creativity and her mastery of the instrument. These works owe a great deal to the tradition of the Romantic piano sonata, while sharing some characteristics with Ferruccio Busoni's "Neue Klassizität" and French neoclassicism, occasionally giving homage to the contrapuntal keyboard works of JS Bach and Max Reger. Sonata No. 6 (1951-52) Apart from an abandoned first movement of a projected Seventh Sonata, this is Eckhardt-Gramatté's last piano sonata. The American pianist Andrew Heath approached Eckhardt-Gramatté in Vienna in 1951 about including one of her compositions in a recital. For a number of years, at the suggestion of pianist Robert Wallenborn, the mostly left-hand third movement from the ...
  • Heinrich Ignaz Biber (1644-1704) - Passacaglia from the Ro Heinrich Ignaz Biber (1644-1704) - Passacaglia from the Rosary Sonatas The 17th-century composer and violinist Heinrich Biber was born in Bohemia and moved to Salzburg in 1670, where he flourished and was able to explore his faith through music and composition. Brought up with a Jesuit education, Biber frequently incorporated sacred themes into his instrumental works, including in his Rosary sonatas, compiled in those first years in Salzburg. The Mystery Sonatas, also known as the Rosary Sonatas, constitute one of the virtuoso high points of Baroque violin literature, and the opening passacaglia fully displays Bibers contrapuntally daring and technically demanding style of writing. Never one to leave his faith far behind, Biber included a set of engravings with his m***cript that illustrated each piece; this passacaglia and its opening incipit depicts the Guardian Angel. Jin Kim performs this piece on , directed by Jerry Fuller, is a series free video web cast programs of music from the Renaissance, Baroque, and Classical eras performed on period instruments. Video production by Phillip W. Serna for . Copyright 2010 Jerry Fuller.
  • Ruffo - La Gamba in Basso, e Soprano VINCENZO RUFFO (c. 1508-1587) "La Gamba" for a soprano instrument and basso continuo Performed by Hesperion XXI Directed by Jordi Savall *Vincenzo Ruffo was an Italian composer of the Renaissance. He was one of the composers most responsive to the musical reforms suggested by the Council of Trent, especially in his composition of masses, and as such was an influential member of the Counter-Reformation. Vincenzo Ruffo was born at Verona, and became a priest there in 1531. Most likely he studied with Biagio Rossetti, the organist at the cathedral in Verona. Ruffo published his first book of music in 1542. Also in 1542 he became maestro di cappella at the cathedral in Savona, but he only held this position for a year; the cathedral was destroyed in 1543 by the Genoese, and Ruffo fled. In either 1543 or 1544 he went to Milan to work for Alfonso d'Avalos, who was the governor of Milan at this time. When d'Avalos was called back to Madrid in 1546, Ruffo went back to in Verona, where he was the music director at the Accademia Filarmonica in 1551-1552, superseding Jan Nasco; in 1554 he became the choirmaster at the cathedral of Verona. While there he probably taught Gian Matteo Asola and Marc' Antonio Ingegneri, the teacher of Monteverdi; it is possible, though not proven, that he taught Andrea Gabrieli there as well. His music during this time was strongly influenced by the Franco-Flemish school, but when he in 1563 became maestro di cappella in the cathedral of Milan under ...
  • Haydn Symphony No 83 G minor 'La Poule' Mantova Chamber Orchestra Mvt.1.avi The Symphony No. 83 in G minor, Hoboken I/83, is the second of the six so-called Paris Symphonies (numbers 82-87) written by Joseph Haydn in 1785 and it was published by Artaria in Vienna in December 1787. It is popularly known as The Hen (French: La poule). The nickname comes from the clucking second subject in the first movement, which reminded listeners of the jerky back-and forth head motion of a walking hen. The symphony is in standard four movement form and scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, continuo (harpsichord) and strings. 1. Allegro spiritoso, 4/4 2. Andante, 3/4 in E flat major 3. Menuet: Allegretto - Trio, 3/4 in G major 4. Finale: Vivace, 12/8 in G major The symphony opens in stormy G minor with the minor triad further intensified by the added dissonance of the C♯. The dotted rhythms that answer are transformed into fanfares later in the first theme group of the sonata form movement. The second theme in B flat major features dotted repeated notes in a solo oboe against jerky appoggiatura in the first violins. This is the "Hen" motif that gives the symphony its nickname, although it is also related to the dotted rhythm response in the first theme. The development features the exploration of the two themes in different keys. It opens with the first theme in C minor, followed by the second theme in E flat major and F minor. The first theme is then heard contrapuntally leading towards the dominant allowing for a retransition to the tonic for ...
  • Franz Schubert - D. 710 "Im Gegenwärtigen Vergangenes" (Goethe) Franz Schubert, "Im Gegenwärtigen Vergangenes", quartet for male & piano, D. 710 (1821) Wolfgang Sawallisch (piano), Capella Bavariae Schubert's setting of Goethe's "Im Gegenwartigen Vergangenes" (The Past in the Present) (D. 710) is one of the least-known and one of the most structurally unusual of all his Goethe songs. Composed in March 1821, Im Gegenwartigen Vergangenes is in four distinct sections. The song begins as a tender Lied for solo tenor with piano accompaniment, adds a second tenor in the second verse as the tempo increases to a ravishing Allegretto, and adds two basses to the tenors for the third verse when the tempo increases to a friskier Allegro moderato. It then returns to the solo tenor for the final verse at the slower and more expansive Andantino quasi allegretto tempo, but this time contrapuntally joined by the first bass, then the second tenor, then the second bass. Remarkably, the entire structure holds together marvelously well, with each change building upon all that preceeded it until it eases into the consoling closing verse. Schubert's control of form enabled him to compose a song that holds a world of emotions in a single span. Painting in the video: CARAVAGGIO "Sleeping Cupid" 1608 Oil on canvas, 71 x 105 cm Galleria Palatina (Palazzo Pitti), Florence
  • Bach in Accordion Bach's work played on accordion, contrapuntally.
  • Me singing "So Long, Mom (A Ballad for World War III)" with Tom Brier on piano I'm not a good singer, as the drunk guy who keeps getting in the way rudely proclaims into the camera, but we're having fun, so nyah! Of course, this song's music and lyrics were by Tom Lehrer. This was written in 1965, in the midst of the Cold War with fears of nuclear annihilation on everyone's minds. For those wondering, yes, we did do "The Vatican Rag" also (which is a Lehrer song that Brier said he'd only heard of but never had actually heard before), but page-turning problems got us way out of sync and it was a bit of a massacre, so I probably won't post it. Sorry for my awful hair. I forgot to bring my brush, so had a severe case of helmet-hair. Thanks to Will Perkins (YouTube's "wilscool") for operating my camera! Lyrics: So long, Mom I'm off to drop the bomb So don't wait up for me. But while you swelter Down there in your shelter You can see me On your TV. While we're attacking frontally Watch Brink-al-ley and Hunt-al-ley Describing contrapuntally The cities we have lost. No need for you to miss a minute Of the agonizing holocaust. Little Johnny Jones, he was a US pilot And no shrinking violet was he. He was mighty proud when World War Three was declared He wasn't scared, no siree! And this is what he said on His way to Armageddon: So long, Mom I'm off to drop the bomb So don't wait up for me. But though I may roam, I'll come back to my home. Although it may be A pile of debris. Remember, Mommy I'm off to get a commie So send me a salami And try to smile somehow ...
  • Septet (1953) - 3rd Movement (Gigue) - Igor Stravinsky Stravinsky's Wind Octet of the early 1920s has sometimes been cited as an exemplar of his neo-Classical style; the Septet of 30 years later, scored for an ensemble of similar size but with more variety of timbre, shows him combining the neo-Classicism with some of the elements of another major trend in 20th-century music, the serial procedures evolved by Arnold Schoenberg, Alban Berg, and Anton Webern. Without being based on a 12-tone row in the strict fashion of the serialists, the Septet is still generated thematically by means of a single series of notes: heard at the very start of the first movement, these notes are then reversed in sequence to form the subject of a fugal passage. The Passacaglia movement takes its main theme from the same series, but the tones are scattered out among the parts of four disparate instruments: clarinet, cello, viola, and bassoon. The word "passacaglia" was used by Baroque composers to describe a piece based on a single, constantly-elaborated theme; in this movement Stravinsky constructs a set of nine variations, all quite short, and all laid out contrapuntally as miniature canons, presenting the theme forwards and backwards and inverted. The concluding Gigue continues the emphasis on counterpoint, as subdivisions of the ensemble - the strings, and the winds with piano - play a series of fugues, whose subject is based on the same sequence of notes that unifies and informs this remarkably ingenious composition.
  • Mozart Piano Concerto 5 (Malcolm Frager, piano) movement 3 Mozart tackles a problem in this Allegro, how to introduce contrapuntal elements in a sonata-form movement, that he was to revisit several more times. Being Mozart, it must be tackled in the very first piano concerto he fully composed himself! "Relaxed, smiling, Malcolm Frager plays the piano as he breathes. He is endowed with intelligence as well as digital dexterity. But his facility, his brio, does not overshadow his refined sensibility or the depth and seriousness of his musicianship"-- The Guardian Sad to say, Malcolm Frager was diagnosed with cancer not long after this concerto was filmed, and he died in 1991. This may well have been the last thing he filmed. Mozart Piano Concerto In D Major, K. 175 No.5....Mozart later composed a more tuneful rondo finale for this concerto, thinking it would be more popular with the Viennese audience than what John Irving described this original third movement, the "intellectual, contrapuntally conceived sonata-form finale". Piano Concerto In D Major, K. 175 No.5, third movement: Allegro Malcolm Frager, Steinway piano, with the orchestra of Italian Language Radio and Television of Switzerland, under Marc Andreae. Recorded Live at the Teatro Scientifico Del Bibiena, Mantua, 19 April 1989. Orchestra della Radio-televisione della Svizzera Italiana, Leitung: Marc Andreae Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart (1756-1791) Klavierkonzert Nr. 05, D-Dur, KV 175
  • Haydn Symphony No 83 G minor 'La Poule' Mantova Chamber Orchestra Mvt.2.avi The Symphony No. 83 in G minor, Hoboken I/83, is the second of the six so-called Paris Symphonies (numbers 82-87) written by Joseph Haydn in 1785 and it was published by Artaria in Vienna in December 1787. It is popularly known as The Hen (French: La poule). The nickname comes from the clucking second subject in the first movement, which reminded listeners of the jerky back-and forth head motion of a walking hen. The symphony is in standard four movement form and scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, continuo (harpsichord) and strings. 1. Allegro spiritoso, 4/4 2. Andante, 3/4 in E flat major 3. Menuet: Allegretto - Trio, 3/4 in G major 4. Finale: Vivace, 12/8 in G major The symphony opens in stormy G minor with the minor triad further intensified by the added dissonance of the C♯. The dotted rhythms that answer are transformed into fanfares later in the first theme group of the sonata form movement. The second theme in B flat major features dotted repeated notes in a solo oboe against jerky appoggiatura in the first violins. This is the "Hen" motif that gives the symphony its nickname, although it is also related to the dotted rhythm response in the first theme. The development features the exploration of the two themes in different keys. It opens with the first theme in C minor, followed by the second theme in E flat major and F minor. The first theme is then heard contrapuntally leading towards the dominant allowing for a retransition to the tonic for ...
  • Haydn Symphony No 83 G minor 'La Poule' Mantova Chamber Orchestra Mvt.4.avi The Symphony No. 83 in G minor, Hoboken I/83, is the second of the six so-called Paris Symphonies (numbers 82-87) written by Joseph Haydn in 1785 and it was published by Artaria in Vienna in December 1787. It is popularly known as The Hen (French: La poule). The nickname comes from the clucking second subject in the first movement, which reminded listeners of the jerky back-and forth head motion of a walking hen. The symphony is in standard four movement form and scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, continuo (harpsichord) and strings. 1. Allegro spiritoso, 4/4 2. Andante, 3/4 in E flat major 3. Menuet: Allegretto - Trio, 3/4 in G major 4. Finale: Vivace, 12/8 in G major The symphony opens in stormy G minor with the minor triad further intensified by the added dissonance of the C♯. The dotted rhythms that answer are transformed into fanfares later in the first theme group of the sonata form movement. The second theme in B flat major features dotted repeated notes in a solo oboe against jerky appoggiatura in the first violins. This is the "Hen" motif that gives the symphony its nickname, although it is also related to the dotted rhythm response in the first theme. The development features the exploration of the two themes in different keys. It opens with the first theme in C minor, followed by the second theme in E flat major and F minor. The first theme is then heard contrapuntally leading towards the dominant allowing for a retransition to the tonic for ...
  • Sofie Sörman & Andy Fite - I'm Obsessed with Breasts (2006) Here's the original recording of this song, from my 2006 album, Other People's Problems. It's straight from a newspaper advice column and though I tweaked it enough so it would rhyme, and work out melodically and contrapuntally, please believe me, I couldn't have made this up! Sofie tears it up, doesn't she? She was already living in Paris when this was recorded, and Stockholm has never been the same since she left.
  • Haydn Symphony No 83 G minor 'La Poule' Mantova Chamber Orchestra Mvt.3.avi The Symphony No. 83 in G minor, Hoboken I/83, is the second of the six so-called Paris Symphonies (numbers 82-87) written by Joseph Haydn in 1785 and it was published by Artaria in Vienna in December 1787. It is popularly known as The Hen (French: La poule). The nickname comes from the clucking second subject in the first movement, which reminded listeners of the jerky back-and forth head motion of a walking hen. The symphony is in standard four movement form and scored for flute, two oboes, two bassoons, two horns, continuo (harpsichord) and strings. 1. Allegro spiritoso, 4/4 2. Andante, 3/4 in E flat major 3. Menuet: Allegretto - Trio, 3/4 in G major 4. Finale: Vivace, 12/8 in G major The symphony opens in stormy G minor with the minor triad further intensified by the added dissonance of the C♯. The dotted rhythms that answer are transformed into fanfares later in the first theme group of the sonata form movement. The second theme in B flat major features dotted repeated notes in a solo oboe against jerky appoggiatura in the first violins. This is the "Hen" motif that gives the symphony its nickname, although it is also related to the dotted rhythm response in the first theme. The development features the exploration of the two themes in different keys. It opens with the first theme in C minor, followed by the second theme in E flat major and F minor. The first theme is then heard contrapuntally leading towards the dominant allowing for a retransition to the tonic for ...
  • Chopin Waltz Op 64 #2 (Epiphany day 14) Jazzers famously dig classical music, and especially from the baroque era. You'll find tons of jazz adaptations of Bach. I think it's because those baroque flurries of notes are easily adaptible to jazz, and his tendency to write contrapuntally, with two or three or several different melodies all going together to form the piece, resembles the way jazz often fits together. You'll also find the occasional adaptation of Chopin, but it's not nearly as common. Why? Who knows? Chopin was a master at writing really impressive-sounding stuff that fits under the hand well, and on top of that he was a brilliant improviser. So. Here's one of my favorites of his, with a little fried chicken in the mix. ______ To find out more about "Epiphany: 50 Days, 50 Songs," check out my website at ______
  • Carl Nielsen - Sinfonie Nr. 5, op. 50 - 2. Satz Sinfonie Nr. 5 2. Satz: Adagio non troppo Finnisches Radio-Sinfonieorchester Helsinki Dirigent: Jukka-Pekka Saraste Symphony No. 5, Op. 50, FS 97 is a symphony composed by Carl Nielsen in Denmark between 1920 and 1922. It was first performed in Copenhagen on 24 January 1922 with the composer conducting. It is one of the two of Nielsen's six symphonies lacking a subtitle. The Fifth Symphony has a non-customary structure, comprising two movements instead of the common three or four. Written in a modern musical language, it draws on the theme of contrast and opposition. The post-WWI composition is also described to contain elements of war. There is no documentation of what inspired Nielsen to write his fifth symphony or when he started to write it, but it is generally understood that the first movement was composed in Humlebæk during the winter and spring of 1921. He stayed at his summer house at Skagen in the early summer. At the end of July he moved to a friend's home at Damgaard to compose the cantata Springtime on Funen, and was therefore only able to resume working on the second movement of the symphony in September, during his free time from his conducting work in Gothenburg. The whole symphony was finished on 15 January 1922, as dated on the score. He dedicated the new symphony to his friends Vera and Carl Johan Michaelsen. Having insufficient rehearsal time, the premiere took place only nine days later, conducted by the composer himself at the music society ...
  • Yo Mama! Edie and Sofa explain it all for you contrapuntally.
  • The Grand Candy - 'The Family Way' The Grand Candy gets down on an old Pluto song featuring our newest member, and oldest friend, Mark Daubert, on B3. Or B3D2, or whatever the digital equivalent of a B3 is. 'The Family Way' was featured on Pluto's 'Par Avion' and also Grits' 'Take One' EP. This tune was a staple of Grits' sets. Interesting to have a new organ where the old dobro used to be. The Candy is looking for a bass player. Must groove hard, funk melodically and contrapuntally, and deliver 'on-the-money' backing vox. Come say hello:
  • KS Sorabji: Fantaisie Espagnole (complete) Thought many of you would like this for my 100th video. Michael Habermann plays Sorabji's Fantaisie Esganole. Sorabji, although he composed some very large works that are pretty dense and contrapuntally brutal, he also composed very colorful works that sound like a mix of Scriabin and Debussy. This is one of his pieces that sticks out to me a little more.
  • Paul Hindemith - String Quartet No. 5, I String Quartet No.5, Op. 32 (1923) I. Lebhafte Halbe II. Sehr langsam, aber immer fliessend III. Kleiner Marsch -- Passacaglia -- Fugato. So schnell wie möglich The Danish Quartet The Amar Quartet was founded in 1920 (with Hindemith as violist) for the express purpose of premiering the composer's String Quartet No. 3 in C major, Op. 16, but continued on through the decade as one of the finest exponents of the modern string quartet literature. Hindemith's subsequent two quartets were composed for the Amar Quartet. The String Quartet No. 5, Op. 32, was written in 1923. Fugal elements are the most prominent feature of this virtuosic score. After a four-note gesture that functions as a motivic cell for the entire work, the first movement launches into a fugue of ferocious energy, polytonal and extremely dissonant, with virtuosic writing and highly resourceful disposition of the four instruments. The middle section arrives abruptly: a rhapsodic interlude with textures of great beauty and complex harmony, in which fugal elements continue to drive the rhetoric. The opening section returns via an ingenious conception wherein the violins skirl contrapuntally in close intervals and high range as viola and cello attempt through repeated shoutings of the four-note cell to end the interlude. The lower strings finally succeed in wresting control of the music, and the movement ends with a strict fugue on the main theme. Rhythmic superimpositions dominate the second movement, a sustained ...
  • Kyle Gann - Pluto (from The Planets) "Pluto is the planet of transformation, power struggles, and obsession. Consquently the piece contains only one idea - the transformation of minor chords into major and vice versa, both contrapuntally and structurally, sometimes carried out in bitonal conflict - and no changes of tempo, meter, or (almost) even rhythm. The effect would be incomplete without a long passage of Plutonian depression." Brought here under the Creative Commons Attribution-Noncommercial 3.0 License (

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about contrapuntally

  • “JAMES ELLROY – Suicide Hill. Mysterious Press, hardcover, 1986; paperback, April 1987. The Hopkins books are contrapuntally structured, with the alternation of perpetrator-cop”
    — " A Review by Mike Nevins: JAMES ELLROY – Suicide Hill,

  • “Posted in Cues, Drama, Epic, Harmony, Instrumentation, Lyrical, Orchestration on December I write contrapuntally for parts so no block chords and most of the resulting harmony is”
    — Music, please. - Leslie Quarcoopome – Composer & Orchestrator,

  • “Politics and Prose is pleased to host Rafael Yglesias on Thursday, July 23. Mark loved Part Two into four chapters and insert those chapters contrapuntally”
    — Q&A with Rafael Yglesias | Politics and Prose, politics-

  • “The color placement has more to do with a syncopated beat that works both with and contrapuntally against the dark figures. Here you can see the placement of the color areas better. And Cindy follows these maps of color with almost”
    — Day Ten,

  • “ Research News & Events Contact. Literature, Arts and Medicine Blog. Home. About. Regional Events. Literature, Arts & Medicine Database several physician writers cross personal and professional boundaries and think contrapuntally in their writing and interaction with patients”
    — Borderlands: A Theme and Syllabus for Medical Humanities, medhum.med.nyu.edu

  • “This year Tina (who runs my office: although she is about to leave me the tablet I will hunt you down. "Contrapuntally speaking it is a jelly mould" she”
    — Blogging from Blackpitts Garden,

  • “His radical aesthetic challenges the notion that the Bible, as the The illustration signifies contrapuntally to the written text. on the plate, which”
    — William Blake and the Bible: Reading and Writing the Law,

  • “After four*** short, atonal, often contrapuntally complex movements played without a edit your posts in this forum. You cannot delete your posts in this”
    — Mythical Records - View topic - combining atonal music with,

  • “Composition and Theory. Harmony and Counterpoint: Contemporary. Thinking contrapuntally while writing. New Topic Reply to Topic. Send I even find that I will create counterpoint that has, at its root, very consonant elements yet layers unrelated elements to”
    — Compose Music Forums - Thinking contrapuntally while writing,

  • “Pygmies, who live in the Congo Basin of central Africa, have probably the oldest surviving music on the planet. "For them music permeates all areas of everyday life.They sing contrapuntally---meaning that the different voices are”
    — Pygmies as Musical Giants,