biogas

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Examples
biogas's examples

  • Biogas production and utilization is an exciting tool for the biopower toolkit and has the ability to reduce greenhouse emissions. Biogas can be produced from organic feedstocks such as manure, crop. — “Great Plains Institute -- Biogas”,
  • Biogas is a byproduct of the decomposition of organic matter by anaerobic bacteria. — “Biogas FAQ”,
  • Biogas is produced by anaerobic digestion or fermentation of biodegradable materials such as biomass, manure, sewage, municipal waste, green waste, Biogas can be used as a low-cost fuel in any country for any heating purpose, such as cooking. — “Biogas - Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Biogas can be used as a vehicle fuel or for generating electricity. Biogas production by anaerobic digestion is popular for treating biodegradable waste because valuable fuel can be produced while destroying disease-causing pathogens and reducing the volume of disposed waste products. — “”,
  • Seedtree's Biogas Program. SeedTree also protects forests in Nepal by promoting and implementing energy conserving technology. Biogas (methane generated from human and animal waste) has been called Deep Green Energy for its many. — “Biogas”,
  • An attempt has been made in this review on the work done by our scientists in understanding the microbial diversity in biogas digesters, their interactions, factors affecting biogas production, alternate feedstocks, and uses of spent slurry. — “Biogas production technology: An Indian perspective”, ias.ac.in
  • G Biogas systems kill the bacteria in livestock manure. A farm with a G Biogas systems produce excellent safe fertilizers for use on the farm. — “biogas”,
  • Biogas Sector Partnership (BSP) Nepal has been extremely successful in pursuing the people living in rural areas to use their cow dung and other waste materials to produce biogas and now there are 145,000 biogas units in the country (roughly 15% of Nepalese households have biogas). — “BioGas Generation Progress in Developing Nations : TreeHugger”,
  • Biogas Design , Construction of Biogas Plants, Different steps of Biogas plant, Construction of Biogas Plants, Different steps of Biogas plant : . — “Biogas Design, Construction steps of biogas plants, Different”,
  • Zorg is a biogas plant construction company. Zorg's bureau designs, constructs and operates biogas plants around the globe. — “Zorg Biogas AG”, zorg-
  • A comprehensive list of resources to renewable or alternate energy resources, specifically Biogas. — “An Introduction to BIOGAS”,
  • Home of the The Biogas Digester Expert web site. Info about biogas digestion, anaerobic digestion and the role of biomass energy as a renewable energy source for the 21st Century. — “Biogas Digesters Expert Information and Articles”, biogas-
  • Canadian Biogas Association - dedicated to the sustainable development of underutilized agricultural resources using Anaerobic Digestion Technology. — “Canadian Biogas Association”, biogas.ca
  • Biogas Manufacturers & Biogas Suppliers Directory - Find a Biogas Manufacturer and Supplier. Choose quality Biogas Manufacturers, Suppliers, Exporters at . — “Biogas-Biogas Manufacturers, Suppliers and Exporters on”,
  • Definition of biogas in the Online Dictionary. Meaning of biogas. Pronunciation of biogas. Translations of biogas. biogas synonyms, biogas antonyms. Information about biogas in the free online English dictionary and encyclopedia. — “biogas - definition of biogas by the Free Online Dictionary”,
  • Biogas definition, any gas fuel derived from the decay of organic matter, as the mixture of methane and carbon dioxide produced by the bacterial decomposition See more. — “Biogas | Define Biogas at ”,
  • Biogas is a biologically generated renewable energy that can be produced from organic wastes by simple systems and used for cooking, lighting, heating, absorption refrigeration, etc. Biogas is produced when biomass decomposes in an oxygen-free environment in a process called anaerobic digestion. — “Biogas - BioenergyWiki”,
  • Biogas originates from biogenic material and is a type of biofuel. One type of biogas is produced by anaerobic digestion or fermentation of biodegradable materials such as biomass, manure, sewage, municipal waste, green waste, plant material and energy crops. — “Biogas - Kosmix : Reference, Videos, Images, News, Shopping”,
  • Several different types of bacteria work together to break down complex organic wastes in stages, resulting in the production of "biogas. The biogas produced in a digester (also known as "digester gas") is actually a mixture of gases, with methane and carbon dioxide making up more. — “Biomass Energy Home Page Biogas Technology”, oregon.gov
  • What is biogas? Biogas is the gaseous product of the anaerobic digestion (decomposition without oxygen) of In rural communities, small-scale digesters provide biogas for single-household cooking and lighting. — “Alternative Fuels and Advanced Vehicles Data Center: What is”, afdc.energy.gov
  • The following article is a local copy of the Wikipedia article at Biogas. Biogas is produced by anaerobic digestion or fermentation of biodegradable materials such as biomass, manure, sewage, municipal waste, green waste, plant material and energy crops.[1] This type of biogas comprises primarily. — “Wikipedia:Biogas - Global Warming Art”,
  • Biogas means a gas produced by the anaerobic digestion or fermentation of organic matter in an environment without oxygen. Biogas production by anaerobic digestion is popular for treating biodegradable waste because valuable fuel can be produced while destroying disease. — “Biogas - Simple English Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia”,
  • Problem: Cooking fuel, waste disposal, inefficiency of traditional biogas cattle dung digesters Is it possible to use the compact biogas system in urban environments?. — “How to Build the ARTI Compact Biogas Digestor - Howtopedia”,
  • Biogas. This is the mixture of gas produced by methanogenic bacteria while acting upon biodegradable materials in an anaerobic condition. Biogas is mainly composed of 50 to 70 percent methane, 30 to 40 percent carbon dioxide (CO2) and low amount of other gases as shown in Table 1. — “SD : Environment : A system approach to biogas technology”,
  • Biomass residues can be converted into various forms, one of which is biogas. Biogas is a well-established fuel for cooking and lighting in a number of countries, whilst a major motivating factor in the development of liquid. — “Category:Biogas - Appropedia: The sustainability wiki”,

Videos
related videos for biogas

  • BIOGAS ENERGY PROJECT Onsite Power Systems Biogas Energy Project (Anaerobic Phased Solids Digester)
  • Animation of a simple telescoping biogas digester For this simple animation describing just how simple it is to build your own biogas digester I downloaded Google Sketchup 7 and then used Google 3D Warehouse to download a model of a digester by roilbilad130 called "Biogas untuk limbah dapur" which is Indonesian for "Biogas for Kitchen Garbage". I changed the food inlet pipe and the fertilizer output pipe to reflect the way they work in the ARTI India systems we have been building in Cairo and Germany and set different sequence animation key frames in Sketchup and did screen capture in Snap Z Pro. Building real digester is about as easy as building a digital one in sketchup -- it really is just two plastic barrels, one inverted inside the other, with three pipes -- one to get the food in, one to take the liquid fertilizer out and one at the top to deliver the gas to your cookstove or generator. 1000 liter tanks should get you about 2 hours of cooking gas a day if you live in a warm climate. As shown, we intend to use psychrophilic bacteria at the bottom to increase cold weather production. The process is very simple -- on the first day you put in about 40 kg of animal manure (horse or cow work fastest, but anything will work) and fill up the container with water. Then place the gas collector on top with the valve open so it sinks down into the bottom container, driving out the air. Then close the valve. After about 3 weeks the gas being created inside the container will be flammable. From that point on you start adding ...
  • Cheap Biogas The worlds cheapest commercial biogas plant
  • Compact digester for producing biogas from food waste The Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI) in Pune has developed a biogas plant which uses food waste rather than manure as feedstock and supplies biogas for cooking. The plant is sufficiently compact to be used by urban households, and over 700 are currently in use. Pune is a relatively affluent city in south India, and many people use liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or kerosene for cooking. Waste food is often discarded at the side of the road, as in many cities, attracting stray dogs, flies and rats and creating a public health hazard. The ARTI compact biogas plant is made from two standard high-density polyethylene (HDPE) water tanks: the larger tank acts as the digester and the smaller one is inverted and placed into it to serve as a gas-holder. The plant safely digests kitchen waste, food waste or waste flour from mills, thus reducing the problem of waste disposal. A 1000 litre plant produces sufficient biogas to at least halve the use of LPG or kerosene for cooking in a household, as well as a small amount of liquid effluent which can be used as fertiliser. ARTI has developed the technology, field tested it, and managed the supply of about 700 biogas plants in Maharashtra. Around 100 plants are now being installed every month. www.arti-
  • Biogas technologies - Schmack Biogas Integrated biogas technologies developed by Germany's leading company in the sector, Schmack Biogas AG.
  • Biogas Digester for the Home Here is a home version of the biogas digester converting pony manure into usable gas for cooking and heating.
  • Biogas - the movie This is an information movie on biogas as an environmentally friendly vehicle fuel, produced by Kristianstad municipality in Sweden. Kristianstad municipality has been appointed the best Swedish municipality on climate change, and indtroducing biogas as a vehicle fuel is part of the work to reduce the release of greenhouse gases. You can read more on the website: www.kristianstad.se/english
  • Conversations With Farmers: Madame Helen Explains Her Biogas Stove Worldwatch Institute Senior Researcher, Danielle Nierenberg, interview with Madame Helen Bahikwe, a Heifer International beneficiary, for the upcoming State of the World 2011: Nourishing the Planet.
  • Build a Biogas digester (1) The video is published under Vietnam EASE Programme which stands for Enabling Access to Sustainable Energy. This is the product of the project Biogas Market Development implemented by RCEE/CCRD. This biogas digester is the Improved VACVINA model technology.
  • Biogas Generator This is a presentation about biogas.
  • Biogas: From Grass to Gas (English) Biogas technology is a new twist on an old tradition: using cow dung in a clean, efficient way to produce cooking and heating fuel in the form of safely produced methane gas. Find out why biogas is the most cost-effective energy solution for India's rural population and find out how YOU can help -- by encouraging local governments to support biogas projects more enthusiastically, by supporting the technology financially, and even by aiding in the construction of the plants themselves! You can get more information about the technology at ! Narrated by: Sandeep Prasanna (English/Kannada) Written by: Karan Chhabra (English), BN Pemmaiah (Kannada) Filmed by: Katie Swails Special Thanks to: Pam and Anil Malhotra, SAI Sanctuary, Duke University Biology Department, Duke Center for Civic Engagement (DukeEngage)
  • Biogas digestor Demonstration of a system that converts plant debris to methane. Built for the course EES390 Sustainability Science taught by Professor John Ayers at Vanderbilt University.
  • KIST, Rwanda, Large-scale biogas plants - Ashden Award winner This video can be downloaded here: KIST won an Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy in 2005. To find out more visit the link above and check out the Ashden Awards Blog The Kigali Institute of Science, Technology and Management (KIST), has developed and installed large-scale biogas plants in prisons in Rwanda to treat toilet wastes and generate biogas for cooking. After the treatment, the bio-effluent is used as fertiliser for production of crops and fuelwood. Large prisons, each housing typically 5000 prisoners, are a legacy of the troubled past of Rwanda. Sewage disposal from such concentrated groups of people is a major health hazard for both the prison and the surrounding area. The prisons also use fuelwood for cooking, putting great pressure on local wood supplies. Using biogas digesters to manage animal or human sewage is not a new idea, but in Rwanda has been applied on an enormous scale, and with great success. Each prison is supplied with a linked system of underground digesters, so the sight and smell of the sewage are removed. KIST staff manage the construction of the system, and provide on-the-job training to both civilian technicians and prisoners. The biogas is piped to the prison kitchens, and halves the use of fuelwood. The fertiliser benefits both crop production and fuelwood plantations. The first prison biogas plant started operation in 2001, and has run with no problems since then. Biogas plants are now ...
  • I've Got A Secret - Cow Pooping Things get crappy on the game show "I've Got A Secret" in 1959 when a cow starts dropping brown solids instead of white liquids.
  • Biogas solution in India A company in southern India has come up with a viable way for poor households to help themselves. The locally-made biogas plant, filled with bacteria found in the stomachs of cows, silently and odorlessly converts food waste and into gas. More than 20 thousand homes in Kerala have installed the hand made plant, and the money they save pays off the machine in less than 3 years. Their home cooking, they say, tastes all the better for its green credentials. Al Jazeera's Tarek Bazley reports from Thiruvananthapuram, India, on a solution in India that got's plenty of merit when it comes to powering homes in areas of the developing world often beset by power cuts.
  • Biogas at Broward Dining Hall- Undergraduate Honors Thesis 2008 This project examines the potential of producing biogas from the food waste at Broward Dining Hall on the University of Florida.
  • AIDFI BioGas, Distiller & Water Pump Technologies THE STORY OF AIDFI (Alternative Indigenous Development Foundation, Inc.) : Biogas: a technology that converts wastes of pigs into methane gas that can be used for cooking stove, electricity and biofertilizer. The park has a 10 m3 biogas plant and is fed by 10 pigs. AIDFI can set up 3, 5 or 10 m3 plant. Essential Oil Distiller: is for steam distillation of lemongrass, citronella, vitiver, eucalyptus, ginger, ylang-ylang, etc. It has a capacity of 100 kgs. AIDFI will fabricate distiller for any group provided they are sure of their product and has a good market. Treadle Pump: also known as "tapak-tapak" pump. This foot pump delivers a good volume of water. The pressurized model can deliver to an overhead tank with 10-15 meters height. The suction is limited to around 8 meters. The pump uses gasket from jetmatic pumps. Related video from the AIDFI Techno-Park showcase, here: For the Ram Pump video, here: For Hydro-Electricity technologies: For Biogas, Distiller & Water Pump technologies, here: Sample of AIDFI Vermiculture video:
  • Our Biogas Kitchen In Germany it was our common practice to compost all of our kitchen waste. Now that we have built an ARTI India style biogas digestor on the porch, however, we only compost the tissue paper, napkins, cardboard, tea-bags and fibrous, cellulosic material that our household generates as garbage. All the food waste (including flower petals and banana peels) go into the blender with warm water and then into the biogas digestor. What we get out is liquid fertilizer for our rooftop herb, berry and vegetable garden, and biogas. We are still experimenting with the yields of gas, but are so far averaging 10 minutes a day for the small size of our digestor and the small quantities of food waste our family of 2 (with a baby) generates. Two days worth of kitchen waste gives us enough gas to usefully cook for 20 or 30 minutes.
  • Biogas solution in India A company in southern India has come up with a viable way for poor households to help themselves. The locally-made biogas plant, filled with bacteria found in the stomachs of cows, silently and odorlessly converts food waste and into gas. More than 20000 homes in Kerala have installed the hand made plant, and the money they save pays off the machine in less than three years. Their home cooking, they say, tastes all the better for its green credentials. Al Jazeera's Tarek Bazley reports from Thiruvananthapuram, India, on a solution in India that's got plenty of merit when it comes to powering homes in areas of the developing world often beset by power cuts.
  • How biogas works - Kenya See the impact of domestic biogas in Kenya. Saving time, stimulating the emergence of rural entrepreneurs, no more smoke in houses and faster cooking. With: John Maina, Keziah Njoki Thumbi, Peter Thuo and Pauline Waruguru Waweru
  • Biogas from Vegetarian Food Waste - UF BioEnergy Summer School 07 The 2007 Bioenergy Summer Interns conducted a waste audit at the University of Floirda. They collected the biodegradable plates, cups, and forks as well as the thrown-away food from the 'Krishna Lunch' served at the University of Florida to study the suitability of the plates for composting and the food scraps for anaerobic digestion into biogas. This video describes the anaerobic digestion of the waste. Bioenergy School Website: biogas.ifas.ufl.edu UF Biogas Website: biogas.ifas.ufl.edu
  • Running a small engine on household biogas using "brickage' for gas pressure 2 In this video we demonstrate our successful trial using 4 and 6 bricks as the source of weight to create the pressure to fuel our converted two stroke engine/generator to run on biogas made from kitchen wastes. We also experiment with other ways of introducing lubrication oil into the engine. We are pleased to report that a weight of about 24 kilograms (about what an airplane allows you to carry in your luggage, so think a suitcase worth of weight) is enough to keep the generator running. Thus there is no need for any kind of pump or compressor such as we showed in the last video. That simplifies things a lot and makes home biogas electric generation more and more affordable and useful.
  • Introduction to electric biogas generator-HD video This video was translated into English on 07.09.2010 Utilizing biogas to generate electricity is one of the most comprehensive solutions for waste treatment and energy decentralization, especially to cope with electricity shortage situation in Vietnam and other developing countries.. More info: www.ease-
  • Bio-gas from kitchen waste and bio mass - smart energy use This is a small household level bio-gas unit which used kitchen waste as a source. The supernatant liquid that comes out is an excellent fertilizer. Wet waste from the household is converted to an energy resource for cooking. Mohan is based in Kochi Kerala and his contact e-mail is [email protected] yahoo .com and he can also be contacted on his mobile 0 99 47 06 48 62
  • Fully renewable: biogas + wind + solar Biopact has this story: scientists of the University of Kassel in Germany prove that the entire country can be powered by renewables only. They connected biogas, wind and solar power in a distributed way and show it can deliver both baseloads and peakloads. Check more at:
  • SNV-Educational movie for construction of biogas plant Spcial thanks to Felix ter Heegde (FtH) for this great video. The video is one of materials gained during the Biogas Workshop 2011 organized by the Postgraduate Programme Renewable Energy (PPRE) at the University of Oldenburg. More details, visit: www.ppre.uni-
  • SKG Sangha, India, Biogas and fertiliser from slurry - Ashden Award winner This video can be downloaded here: SKG Sangha won an Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy in 2007. To find out more visit the link above and check out the Ashden Awards Blog SKG Sangha has radically improved the lives of thousands of rural families in Karnataka, South India by supplying them with both dung based biogas plants for cooking and a specially designed unit that turns the slurry from the biogas plant into high quality fertiliser. The benefits of biogas are well known. It provides rural women with a cheap, reliable source of energy as well as reducing indoor air pollution and easing pressure on forest resources. Less well known is how turning the biogas residue into high quality fertiliser can increase crop yields and, more importantly, give rural women the chance to make a profit. The units supplied by SKG Sangha produce fertiliser simply by combining the slurry with straw and leaves and then adding worms which re-digest the mixture to produce vermicompost. This vermicompost improves the yields of family crops and the liquid output from the unit can be used as an organic pesticide. The growing demand in India for organic fertiliser means that women can earn as much from selling half the vermicompost they produce as the household earns from selling the crops they grow. Since 1993, SKG Sangha has installed over 43000 biogas plants in the state of Karnataka alone.
  • Scania Bio Gas Engine SGI-12-ST Scania Bio Gas engine running on Bio Gas/ 45% to 60% Methane. This engine runs also on LNG, CNG, LBG, Natural Gas,
  • Biogas Wood Stove Demonstration - Wood Gas- Producer Gas www.USH2.com This stove is a partial oxidation gas generator stove. It produces Hydrogen, Carbon Monoxide, Methane and other cracked organic compounds. The same principle is in our books on gasification of wood for engines and cars. Yes, you CAN run a car off this type of system and over 1 million vehicles did this during WWII... it can still work today
  • How does a biogas plant work? This animation shall explain the biogas technique. You will be shown the process of a biogas plant from the delivery of feedstock to the output of the digestate. This biogas film is useful for everyone, who would like to plan or operate a biogas plant, no matter if you are farmer, energy provider or disposer. Furthermore, the biogas film is excellent for operator training, for school lessons and university purposes. For more informations visit our website
  • ARTI, India, Biogas from food waste - Ashden Award winner This video can be downloaded here: ARTI won an Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy in 2006. To find out more visit the link above and check out the Ashden Awards Blog The Appropriate Rural Technology Institute (ARTI) in Pune has developed a biogas plant which uses food waste rather than manure as feedstock and supplies biogas for cooking. The plant is sufficiently compact to be used by urban households, and over 700 are currently in use. Pune is a relatively affluent city in south India, and many people use liquid petroleum gas (LPG) or kerosene for cooking. Waste food is often discarded at the side of the road, as in many cities, attracting stray dogs, flies and rats and creating a public health hazard. The ARTI compact biogas plant is made from two standard high-density polyethylene (HDPE) water tanks the larger tank acts as the digester and the smaller one is inverted and placed into it to serve as a gas-holder. The plant safely digests kitchen waste, food waste or waste flour from mills, thus reducing the problem of waste disposal. A 1000 litre plant produces sufficient biogas to at least halve the use of LPG or kerosene for cooking in a household, as well as a small amount of liquid effluent which can be used as fertiliser. ARTI has developed the technology, field tested it, and managed the supply of about 700 biogas plants in Maharashtra. Around 100 plants are now being installed every month. The first-prize Ashden ...
  • Biogas project in Karatu Tanzania A short visit to a biogas project in on a small holding in Karatu Tanzania. EWP ZARA. More information: www.zara.co.tz
  • Organic Farming Part II - 'Cow dung to biogas' Like many organic farmers, Jose Elanjhimattam is both a practical and abundantly resourceful man. Starting with cow dung, Jose has created an ingenious system that simultaneously captures and separates nitrogen-rich organic manure and methane gas. Unlike dried cow dung, which tends to lose nitrogen throughout the drying process, the liquefied organic manure produced through Joses slurry provides soil with far higher levels of nitrogen. Additionally, the methane gas removed is used as a form of fuel. Jose estimates that the dung from two cows is sufficient to provide enough biogas to support the cooking requirements of a family of four. Resourceful, intelligent, simple great stuff! Thanks to for this summary! see also Part I 'Organic Farming' Part III 'Organic pesticide and fungicide
  • Adding value to the residue from biogas plants Vivekananda Kendra - Natural Resources Development Project (VK- NARDEP) has sold and installed 2000 biogas plants in southern Tamil Nadu, India, to provide clean biogas for household cooking and fertiliser from the biogas residue. The southern part of Tamil Nadu is hot and humid. Most people work in agriculture and grow rice, sugar cane, mangoes, coconuts and a range of vegetables. The biogas plants sold by VK- NARDEP use cattle manure to produce biogas which saves fuelwood, allows cleaner cooking and gives a healthier environment, with reduced air pollution and fly-borne diseases. VK- NARDEP has also recognised the significant potential of the output residue from biogas plants. This is normally used directly as a fertiliser and weed suppressor which gives significant benefits in a rural agricultural environment. The value of the residue can be increased by using it to grow Azolla, a nitrogen-fixing fern used as animal fodder or green manure. Alternatively, the residue can be made into an improved fertiliser using vermin-composting techniques. The financial savings from avoiding the purchase of wood and chemical fertiliser allow the cost of a biogas plant to be paid back within two to three years. VK-NARDEP has obtained a thorough understanding of the problems which exist amongst many current biogas installations in India through detailed field studies. It has developed a well researched low cost design as a result and is also able to specify the design of plants in ...
  • Green energy solutions www.ntv.co.ke The term "biogas", to many, evokes the thoughts of a green energy solution.But for Samuel Kinoti, an entrepreneur, "biogas" is the source of his livelihood. Kinoti is the brains behind Skylink Innovators, a firm that offers biogas solutions for both individuals and institutions. Alex Mwangi now brings you some insights into biogas through the eyes of an expert.
  • Homemade Biogas Generator This generator shows how organic waste can be converted into fuel. This biogas has a lot of heat energy in it, which can make a good fuel. It does not burn as fast as hydrogen, it burns slower instead of the quick "pop" from hydrogen gas.
  • BIOGAS Digester video featuring the first Dairy Farm in the US to use a Methane Digester to produce Biogas, a compressed natural gas, from cow manure. Shot on location at the Hilarides Dairy in Lindsay, California, where they use biogas to power their milk tanker delivery trucks.
  • Biogas: how it works Biogas typically refers to a gas produced by the biological breakdown of organic matter in the absence of oxygen. Comprised primarily of methane and carbon dioxide, biogas originates from biogenic material and is a type of biofuel. It's a product of the anaerobic digestion or fermentation of biodegradable materials such as manure or sewage, and can be used in CHP plants
  • BIOTECH, India, Turning food waste into biogas - Ashden Award winner This video can be downloaded here: BIOTECH won an Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy in 2007. To find out more visit the link above and check out the Ashden Awards Blog BIOTECH has succeeded in tackling the problem of the dumping of food waste in the streets of Kerala through the installation of biogas plants that use the food waste to produce gas for cooking and, in some cases, electricity for lighting; the residue serves as a fertiliser. To date BIOTECH has built and installed an impressive 12000 domestic plants (160 of which also use human waste from latrines to avoid contamination of ground water), 220 institutional plants and 17 municipal plants that use waste from markets to power generators. The disposal of food waste and the production of clean energy are not the only benefits of BIOTECH's scheme. The plants also replace the equivalent of about 3.7 tonnes of LPG and diesel which in turn results in the saving of about 3700 tonnes/year of CO2, with further savings from the reduction in methane production as a result of the uncontrolled decomposition of waste, and from the transport of LPG.
  • song Shu Biogas Project Leaving Coal Behind Song Shu, a small village in Gansu Province, lives off from farming and livestock raising. The families of Song Shu are highly dependent on coal for cooking, lighting and heating. The cost usually falls around ¥1 per piece and an average rural family usually uses up to about 3-6 coal pieces a day just for cooking and adding the transportation costs of buying coal, coal accounts to a huge chunk of their home utility expenses. is a community that recognizes the importance of looking for renewable sources of energy. The local parish has spearheaded a project that would allow 100 families in Song Shu to replace coal for cooking and lighting with a renewable source of energy biogas. Biogas is a renewable natural gas that contains approximately 70% methane (CH4) and roughly 30% carbon dioxide and trace amounts of other gases. Sources for biogas production include manure (hog, cattle and poultry) and energy crops cut as silage (wheat, barley, triticale, clover, alfalfa, rye grass, turnips and corn), sources which are very much available in Song Shu Village all year round. The parishs efforts in seeking free and renewable sources of energy comes as a huge welcome to these farmers. The key to the success of this project is the construction of 100 small-scale and low-cost waste digesters which would be distributed to 100 families who signed up for the project. The price of building a low-cost waste digester is ¥1700.00 ( €169.00 or ₤134.00 or $249.00). The ...
  • BSP Biogas Sector Partnership, Nepal, Domestic biogas - Ashden Award winner This video can be downloaded here: BSP won an Ashden Award for Sustainable Energy in 2005. To find out more visit the link above and check out the Ashden Awards Blog The Biogas Sector Partnership (BSP) in Nepal managed the installation of over 124000 domestic biogas plants in Nepal between 1992 and 2005. The plants use cattle manure to provide biogas for cooking and lighting. In addition, about 75% of the plants incorporate toilets. About 80% of the 4.2 million households in Nepal use fuelwood, cattle-dung cakes and agricultural residues for cooking, and kerosene for lighting. Demand for fuelwood substantially exceeds the rate of regrowth, and this is leading to degradation of the land and damage to vital watersheds. Cooking indoors over open fires, and lighting with kerosene, gives dangerous exposure to air pollutants and a high risk of fire, particularly for women and young children who spend much of their time indoors. In addition, women and girls have the drudgery of collecting fuelwood, which typically takes three hours each day. The Ashden judges commended this project for the many benefits which it provides. The biogas plants replace nearly all the use of fuelwood, and make cooking easier, cleaner and safer. In 20% of houses biogas provides safer lighting as well. This saving of unsustainable fuelwood use also reduces carbon dioxide emissions. The provision of toilets improves sanitation; and the effluent from the ...
  • biogas simple biogas process with compress unit , filter and gas engine

Blogs & Forum
blogs and forums about biogas

  • “The "Forum Biogas Austria" is a centre of excellence with the aim to optimise biogas production from agrarian biomass. Forum Austria in the fields of advice, planning and. certification. It considers the whole chain of biogas”
    — INSTRUCTIONS FOR PREPARATION OF PAPERS, nas.boku.ac.at

  • “Guest Authors are Welcome on Lankabiogas blog. Filed under: Guest Authors — lankabiogas @ 1:19 am. We are happy to welcome guest authors to write articles related to Sri Lankan biogas projects and expansions.Your articles will is done under interest and support of ITDG and Energy Forum Sri Lanka”
    — Lanka Biogas Association's Blog,

  • “Our company blog : latest information on renewable energy Naskeo blog : news about biogas, anaerobic digestion and renewable energies. You can also read about Naskeo, its news, novelties from the sustainable developpement field, biogas, anaerobic digestion and”
    — Company blog,

  • “A commonly asked question around the Grober Group is We have this protein or we know of this sugar based waste product, can you use it in the”
    Biogas blog - BioGas Blog – mistakes can be costly | Grober Green,

  • “BIOGAS FORUM. 1. 1. 1980. 7. Sasse, L. Germany. Biogas - travelog. BIOGAS FORUM. 1. 3-7. 1980. 8 Germany. Faults in Gas Plant Construction. BIOGAS FORUM. 2. 3-6. 1980. 10. Eggeling, G. Germany”
    Biogas Forum Overview, borda-

  • “Biogas is generated when bacteria degrade biological material in the absence of oxygen, in a process known as anaerobic digestion. The success or failure of any biogas plant mainly depends upon the quality of how it is constructed”
    Biogas | Vada Energy blog,

  • “Questions relating to biogas plant construction, design and projects fair, biogas cooperatives formation. 0. 0. No posts. Other topics. Other forum topics”
    Biogas forum - Index page, forum.zorg-

  • “Welcome to the official launch of the biogas systems blog from the Ontario Ministry of Agriculture, Food, and Rural Affairs. Chris Duke – coordinates the Ontario Biogas Systems Financial Assistance Program and does things like this blog too”
    — Go Biogas! Ontario Agriculture and Food Biogas Systems Blog,

  • “Free international dicussion board on biogas-related topics”
    — Forum: Biogas-Community! - Who is Online,

Keywords
related keywords for biogas